S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com Mack/GE #4 Survivor Boxcab Page keywords = boxcab Mack #4 ALCo GE IR I-R American Locomotive Company General Electric Ingersoll Rand EMD Electro motive oil electric diesel engine rail road museum

Updated:   15 Jun 2011, 12:40  ET
[Page converted 15 Jun 2011; page created 20 Aug 2008;
    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
Update info on the top on ALL pages for your convenience.

URL:  http://sbiii.com/boxmack4.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/boxmack4.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet service effective 31 Mar 2010 and I have been scrambling to transfer everything.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


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S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

Mack/GE #4
Survivor Boxcabs Page

 

I-R 60-ton Demo

A new type of locomotive!
Ingersoll-Rand 1925 Demonstrator #9681
(later CNJ #1000)
(ALCo builders photo S-1484 - source uncertain;
possibly from 1980s AAR flyer)

 

 

ALCo-GE-IR BOXCAB

Oil-Electric ("Diesel") Locomotives

(American Locomotive Company - General Electric - Ingersoll-Rand)

INDEX to Boxcabs Pages:

note-rt.gif   The primary Boxcabs Index has been moved to a separate page,
together with links and credits.

Boxcab Help - A service for boxcab afficionados,
posting reasonable questions (at my sole discretion).

There are now more than seventy-five (75) BOXCAB pages;
see the full INDEX, now on a separate page.

[A new "bugaboo" has reared its ugly head - complexity of organization -
see COMPLEXITY on my main index page.]

  The Boxcabs Index Page

 


1939 Mack #4
(Rebuild of 1924 GE Trolley Motor)
SURVIVOR BOXCAB

Oil-Electric ("Diesel") Locomotive

Mack#4ha
1939 Mack #4 (1924 GE) Boxcab as restored by the McHughs
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

This locomotive, and a sister, were originally built on 01 Mar 1924 by GE as trolley freight motors #3 & #4 for the Southwest Missouri Railroad Company at a cost of $30,900.00.

Mack#4-1a
The Southwest Missouri Railroad Company #5 and #4 trolley freight motor locomotives
coupled together on February 12 1927.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

This is the only known photo of #4 as a GE Electric Motor, in Missouri.  Here both locomotives are shown with the S.M.R.C. employees who built #5 at the lines Webb City shops.  The 600-volt electricity required to power each units's four traction motors was supplied by overhead wire; colletced by the poles on top of the units.  #3 and #4 were built by General Electric in February 1924, with a completion date of 03/01/24.  The S.M.R.C. built identical #5 and #6 in 1927, and #7 & #8 in 1929; only two of these six units survived the demise of the SMRC, with numbers 5, 6, 7, and 8, being scrapped.

note-rt.gif - [The McHugh Railroad Maintenance Co. of Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania, specializes in the design of, routine maintenance or major overhaul of, supplying parts for, and sale of locomotives and locomotive cranes.  Most of the text on this page and the photos are from the website of the McHugh family about the history of and acquisition and restoration of #4, http://www.mchugh4macklocomotive.com, where far more information is available.  I must express my gratitude to JC McHugh for his kind permission to extract and post this information on my Survivor Boxcabs pages - SB,III].

The Mack Truck Company of Allentown, Pennsylvania, purchased #3 and #4 in 1939 and loaded them onto railroad flat cars in Joplin, Missouri, for delivery to Mack's Allentown, Pennsylvania, plant.  The two locomotives were rebuilt into experimental gas electric locomotives with Mack EP gasoline engines, and two 300-volt GE 1503 generators that were wired in series, "in theory" to provide 600 volts to the traction motors.  However, the result was that this design proved to be a not-very-efficient electrical system and tended to be problematic.  The two locomotives were used as plant switchers at the Mack truck factory until 1960:

Mack#4-2a
#4 at the Mack Truck Plant in Allentown, Pennsylvania.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

The Mack Truck Company produced a total of 23 locomotives between 1905 and 1939 with only a few small four-wheel units remaining today:

[Mack was also the builder of rail motor cars ("doodlebugs"); see below.]   new (21 Mar 2106)

Mack#4-2b
Pouch Terminal (Staten Island, NY) Mack #2.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

Mack locomotive #4 is the only eight-wheel unit still in existence.  The #3 & #4 were also the last locomotives ever to be built or rebuilt by Mack Trucks, Inc.  Between 1951 and 1954, Mack produced only ten diesel-powered self-propelled passenger railcars.  Then, in 1956, the last two units sold were purchased back by Mack and rebuilt to another customers specifications.  The two units were resold in 1958 and 1959, and the Mack Truck Company completely exited the railroad business in 1960.

From there, #4 went to the Rockhill Trolley Museum in 1962, where it was seldom operated, being used mainly for work train service to assist with track extension and overhead wire installation, or to shift trolley cars when no power was available on over new trackage:

Mack#4-3a
#4 right outside of the Mack plant in Allentown.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

The Kovalchick Company provided a tractor trailer to load out and transported #4 from the Mack Truck plant in Allentown, Pennsylvania, to the EBT/RTM location, hauled over the highway with a 1950’s model Mack truck tractor.

Mack#4-3b
#4 at RTM, Mt. Union.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

During the last two months of 1968, #4 was moved to Mount Union, Pennsylvania, where it performed switching services at the East Broad Top's dual-gauge railyard.  In early 1970, RTM loaned #4 to Jimmy McHugh, Sr., to assist an eastern Pennsylvania short line railroad until 1971, when it was moved to Penndel, Pennsylvania, where it was placed in storage with other RTM equipment until 1986 when it was moved to the Wanamaker, Kempton & Southern Railroad in Kempton, Pennsylvania.

The East Broad Top summoned #4 to switching duties in Mt. Union.  During November and December of 1968, the dormant rails of the East Broad Top Railroad's Mount Union Yard were once again in service.  It had been 12 years since the 1956 abandonment of the EBT and no trains had operated on this portion of the line since then.  With the EBT now obligated to operate a locomotive here for a short period of time, Mack #4 was called to fulfill this duty.  Although the EBT has two 0-6-0 standard gauge steam locomotives stored here, it was not practical to put them back into service for this work.  The RTM loaned #4 to the EBT for this Mount Union rail yard venture and it was loaded onto a Kovalchick Company tractor trailer and hauled there and unloaded onto the dual-gauge rails.

In Mt. Union, #4 shifted the dual-gauge sidings for approximately a two-month period, moving dozens of empty 3-foot narrow-gauge hopper cars.  It was #4's job to locate and spot 20 cars for possible sale to the White Pass & Yukon Railroad of Alaska.  During inspection by the WP&YRR, they rejected 5 cars and accepted 15 cars.  The transaction required that the cars also be loaded into standard-gauge gondola cars and readied for rail shipment.

Mack#4-4a
Note the 'ramp' track going up into the gondola.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - cropped and enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

The EBT considered using the old "Timber Transfer" overhead crane for this project to lift narrow-gauge hoppers up in the air and then push standard-gauge gondolas under them.  However, after inspection of the "Timber Transfer", it was determined that the repairs to make it operational again far outweighed the benefits of using it for this short term project, and a more cost effective alternate method was devised.

To complete this project the EBT had to cut one of the dual-gauge sidings in half.  At one end they built a dual-gauge loading ramp with the other end of the siding remaining at ground level.  This allowed a standard-gauge gondola car to be pushed up to the end of the ground level end of the ramp.  Then the narrow-gauge hopper cars were pushed up the loading ramp into standard-gauge gondola cars.  Once secured, #4 and each loaded PRR car would then proceed to the EBT-PRR interchange.

These 15 one-car consists were the last official EBT trains to be operated in Mount Union by the East Broad Top Railroad and Mack #4 was the locomotive having this honor.  The engineer of those last Mount Union trains was Stanley Hall, Sr., who currently is the General Manager of the EBT.  After that special work was completed, #4 was then again hauled back to Rockhill Furnace by a Kovalchick Company truck and unloaded at RTM.

Mack#4-4b
#4 and the Timber Transfer.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

On a mild March day in 1970, Mack #4 was loaded onto a McHugh tractor trailer at the RTM museum site in Rockhill Furnace.  Again, #4 was on the move over the highway; this time on loan to Jimmy McHugh, Sr., for use at the bankrupt New Hope & Ivyland short line railroad in eastern Pennsylvania.  McHugh had a fondness for the Mack as well:

Mack#4-5a
Here is the #4 at RTM ready for its trek to the NH&I.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - cropped and enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

Once #4 arrived at New Hope, it was placed onto the front track siding of the Union Camp Paper Mill which was located directly across from the passenger station.  During an inspection before being placed into service here, a few defects were found.  With the help of several of Jimmy McHugh, Sr.'s friends and RTM members, the necessary mechanical repairs and adjustments were made, including the repair of a traction motor.  The intent was to use #4 here as a backup locomotive for passenger trains when a steam locomotive was out of service.  When #4 was placed into service there, it proved to be underpowered for the many long grades on that rail line.  With #4 only able to handle a one-car passenger train, it was not an efficient alternate locomotive when three-car trains were normally required.  At the end of that same year (1970), #4 was eventually parked on the unused back track siding of the Union Camp Paper Company mill.

Mack#4-5b
#4 stored at the Union Camp mill.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

With #4 unsuitable for road service at the NH&I, it was then again moved, this time (in 1971) to the McHugh Company facility in Penndel, Pennsylvania.

Mack#4-6a
#4 stored at McHugh/Penndel.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

Here it received additional repairs including sheet-metal work, sandblasting, and primer paint, for it’s owner, RTM, at no charge.  At that time, RTM decided to place #4 into storage with four other RTM pieces of railway equipment which were also stored at the McHugh Penndel site free of charge to RTM.

Mack#4-6b
#4 stored at Penndel with other RTM units.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - cropped and enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

The Wanamaker, Kempton & Southern Railroad (the Hawk Mountain Line) obtained ownership of #4 in March 1986 and moved it to their site.  The WK&S already owned the Mack #3 which they had lettered as "WK&S #35", and operated it on their line on special occasions.  However, at that time, it was out of service due to an engine failure and other mechanical defects.  The WK&S planned to rebuild one locomotive from both of the units, but this never did materialize.

Mack#4-7a
#35 (#3) coupled to L&NE Bobber #512 at the WK&S.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)

Over the years, both locomotives had been stripped of many major valuable parts, including the trolley-car-style truck assemblies and traction motors, by their two former owners, RTM and the WK&S.

[A little-known fact - the trucks from Mack #3 are now under the Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum's trolley car #10
and the trucks from #4 are now out at Rockhill Trolley Museum; awaiting potential use.]

Mack#4-7b
Retrucking #35 (scrambling/unscrambling?).
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

When it seemed that both Mack locos we're destined for the torch, a family quite familiar with the locomotive stepped in to help save these rare pieces of railroad history; the McHugh family.  "Once JC convinced his wife Ann to be on-board for the project," his father Jimmy McHugh stated, "lets send a truck and trailer up to Kempton, and bring Mack #4 home."

Mack#4-fa
#35 (#4) on the McHugh trailer with McHugh equipment at the WK&S.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

After the Mack Locomotives were purchased, the McHugh’s then acquired replacements for the critical missing parts, including two sets of truck assemblies complete with two 300-volt traction motors, updated air brake equipment, two old-style headlights, an old-fashioned bell, and a whistle.

On the morning of 22 May 2008, the skilled and very-professional working volunteer crew at the WK&S railroad began to lay down the special track ramps to the highway transport trailer in the town of Kempton.  Then the first Mack locomotive was pushed up onto this specialized trailer with one of the WK&S diesel locomotives and then it was secured and delivered.  The second of the two Mack locomotives was loaded onto a highway truck trailer by the WK&S work crew on 23 May and transported to the McHugh Locomotive & Crane Company facility and unloaded on 24 May.

Mack#4-fb
#35 (#4) being pushed onto the McHugh trailer at the WK&S.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

J. C. turned up this shot of #35 (#4) leaving the WK&S at Kempton (18 Sep 2008):

Mack#4-fb
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

During the last week of May 2008, the #3 was parted out and it’s unsalvageable frame was scrapped.  However, the many valuable items saved from #3 have been used in the repair of #4.  With these two locomotives being identical, the two old units have been combined together to make up one complete Mack locomotive.

Old, rusty #4 has now had some very necessary repairs made to it, as well as being cosmetically restored.  It is currently placed on a short section of track at the McHugh Company plant in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania, for display.

Mack#4-fc
#4 at the McHugh Fairless Hills facility.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

On special occasions the complete #4 locomotive will be loaded onto a tractor trailer and transported to a railroad or historical equipment show to be temporarily displayed so the general public and railway enthusiasts can view and enjoy this very unique "one of a kind" GE-Mack locomotive.  It is hoped that, in the future, the locomotive will be again returned to operating condition.  "We've fixed 'em before, we'll fix them again," said McHugh, "and we're even happier that it's ours and has forever escaped the scrapper's torch."  [Amen, brother!]

In early 2008, it had been rumored that if new guardians could not be found for either locomotive, that they both would see the scrappers torch due to the high increase dollar value of scrap iron.  However, their uncertain fate changed because a relationship had developed between the then-current owners of the two Mack locomotives and the McHugh Locomotive and Crane Company resulting in a positive future for one locomotive #4.  Although a few felt that neither of these two locomotives should be saved, this did not discourage the McHugh family; the family was adamant that they would save at least one of these old Mack locomotives.

Mack#4-hb
Restored #4 at Fairless Hills.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

The McHugh family's nostalgia for old #4 (along with it being a part of Pennsylvania’s industrial railroading heritage) is why they wanted to see it preserved.  When #4 was in service during 1970, Jimmy McHugh, Sr., placed his son on the engineers seat of #4 one day and it was the first locomotive JC McHugh operated.  Here are the McHughs in front of #4:

Mack#4-mc
J.C., Ann, and Jimmy McHugh with Restored #4.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

Here she (#4 - not Ann) is, in all her glory:

Mack#4-hc
Restored #4.
(Photo courtesy of JC McHugh - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

#4's interesting journeys can be followed in even far more detail on the McHugh family site at:

http://www.mchugh4macklocomotive.com/

There are even videos of #4 in action on the McHughs's site.

Those of us who appreciate old oil-electric/diesel locomotives, or just plain history of technology, owe the McHughs a great debt of gratitude, both for what they have done with #4 and for their fabulous website which enables us to understand all the intricacies of #4's (and #3's) journeys.



PAGE INDEX:

This page is unindexed.

On the Survivor Boxcabs Roster page:
  SURVIVOR BOXCAB LOCATIONS MAP.
  ROSTER OF SURVIVING ALCo-GE-IR BOXCABS.

On the succeeding Survivor Boxcabs Continuation Page:
  NOTES (by item number per listing) - specific notes about each survivor.

The page of NOTES was split off from the Survivors Roster page
and the engine listings renumbered on 10 Sep 99.

There are now separate pages for each surviving boxcab.  This unit, Mack #4, is Item "K" on the map noted above.


Mack was also the builder of rail motor cars ("doodlebugs"); some of these were later converted into rail inspection cars and theor story is told on the RR Ultrasonics Page:
  new (21 Mar 2106)    
Ultrasonics and Railroading,
    Sperry Ultrasonic Rail Flaw Detector Cars,
    Mack Railcars-cum-Inspection Cars,
    Sperry Rail Service Roster Shots,


Notes on surviving ALCo-GE-IR (and just GE-IR or GE alone) boxcabs are on the Survivor Boxcabs Notes page.

Other surviving gas/oil-electric/diesel boxcabs (including +, @, and *, on map on Survivor Boxcabs page) are noted on the Other Boxcabs continuation page.

Other surviving electric (and any other odd) boxcabs (including e and ?, on map) are noted on the Odd Boxcabs continuation page.



LEGACY

  What happens to all this when I DIE or (heaven forfend!) lose interest?  See LEGACY.


There are now more than seventy-five (75) BOXCAB pages;
see the full INDEX, now on a separate page.



COPYRIGHT NOTICE

See Copyright Notice on primary home page.



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