S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com GE Survivor Boxcab Singer #1 Page keywords = boxcab ALCo GE IR I-R American Locomotive Company General Electric Singer #1 Ingersoll Rand EMD Electro motive oil electric diesel engine rail road 47 1000 museum Indiana Transportation

Updated:   13 Jun 2013, 18:35 ET
[Page converted 18 Oct 2011; page created 02 Nov 2008{?};
    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
Update info on the top on ALL pages for your convenience.

URL:  http://sbiii.com/boxsing1.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/boxsing1.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet service effective 31 Mar 2010 and I have been scrambling to transfer everything.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


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S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

GE Survivor Electric Boxcab
Singer #1 Page

I-R 60-ton Demo

A new type of locomotive!
Ingersoll-Rand 1925 Demonstrator #9681
(later CNJ #1000)
(ALCo builders photo S-1484 - source uncertain;
possibly from 1980s AAR flyer)

 

 

ALCo-GE-IR BOXCAB

Oil-Electric ("Diesel") Locomotives

(American Locomotive Company - General Electric - Ingersoll-Rand)

INDEX to Boxcabs Pages:

note-rt.gif   The primary Boxcabs Index has been moved to a separate page, together with links and credits.

Boxcab Help - A service for boxcab afficionados,
posting reasonable questions (at my sole discretion).

There are now more than seventy-five (75) BOXCAB pages;
see the full INDEX, now on a separate page.

[A new "bugaboo" has reared its ugly head - complexity of organization -
see COMPLEXITY on my main index page.]


Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"
Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher


  I-R 60-ton Demo

A new type of locomotive!
Ingersoll-Rand 1925 Demonstrator #9681
(later CNJ #1000)
(ALCo builders photo S-1484 - source uncertain;
possibly from 1980s AAR flyer)

GE SURVIVOR BOXCAB Singer #1

Electric Locomotive

(General Electric - 1898)

 

There are now more than seventy (70) BOXCAB pages;
see the main Boxcabs page and the Boxcabs INDEX.


PAGE INDEX:

This page is unindexed - please scroll down.

See the SURVIVOR BOXCAB LOCATIONS MAP.

and the

ROSTER OF SURVIVING ALCo-GE-IR BOXCABS.

See also the Electric Boxcabs page, et seq.

There are now separate pages for each AGEIR or similar surviving boxcab; the redundant material is being removed (very slowly).


General Electric 1898 Singer #1 (S1 on Survivors Map) -

Singer1Zillman
(Zillmer/Ussher/Strombeck photo - full credit below*, courtesy of J. Strombeck - all rights reserved)
[click on thumbnailed picture for larger image)

I'd just (24 Oct 2008) heard of yet another survivor boxcab, Singer #1, an 1898 standard gauge General Electric locomotive (boxcab shunter), displayed operable, with a double-ended wood cab with an arch roof, which was taken out of service in 1955.  She was first preserved that year by a private owner in the Chicago area, Robert A. Selle, and then went to the Indiana Transportation Museum at Forest Park in Noblesville, Indiana (some 10 miles due north of Indianapolis), at some unspecified date.  I'd posted this information on the Survivor Boxcabs page and on the GE Boxcabs page and was trying to get more information about her; as I suspected, she turned out to be an electric traction box motor rather than a gasoline or oil loco.  Now that I know more, she merits a dot on the map and this page of her own.

* - Harry Zillmer and George Ussher used to photograph RR scenes together; when George died, his photos went to Harry, so the old photo of #1, above (which I found on Tom Kepshire's Monon site), is from Harry's collection, which in turn went to Jeff Strombeck, and might have been taken by either one of them, and is reproduced here as being from the collection of Jeff Strombeck, with his kind permission {whew!}.

Shortly after notifying me of #1's existence, my correspondent told P. J. Dean, a volunteer at the Indiana Transportation Museum, of my interest and I then received a packet of information and pictures taken there.  First, a front view and some interior shots:

Singer1a Singer1c Singer1d Singer1h
(Photos by W. J. Dean - all rights reserved)
[click on thumbnailed pictures for larger images)

Note that the cab is off center,with a walkway down one side only.

Next we have a view of the placarding, front and side details, and another shot of the control stand:

Singer1b Singer1e Singer1f Singer1g
(Photos by W. J. Dean - all rights reserved)
[click on thumbnailed pictures for larger images)

The Singer Manufacturing Company's plant in South Bend, Indiana, was located there to take advantage of local hardwoods used to make cases for Singer sewing machines.  Steam locomotives were not advisable in a lumber storage yard, so GE furnished four small electric box motors (locomotives) over the years, starting in 1901; only #1 was used inside the South Bend plant, shunting small lumber flats between storage sheds, the kiln(s?), and the factory.  #2 (even smaller) hauled coal to the power plant, #3 was sent to the Singer sawmill in Cairo, Illinois, and #4 (slightly larger) handled yard interchange with the New York Central and the New Jersey, Indiana & Illnois railroads.  The plant also had a line car (a trailer) and six coal hoppers; when the plant closed down in 1955, a few hoppers went to Bendix in South Bend and #1 was saved.  All other rail equipment was scrapped.

    (information and following photo from a pamphlet by Robert A. Selle, MCERA,
reprinted in CERA Bulletin 104)

1915SingerLocos-1-2-4
(GE photo via R. E. Selle from CERA Bulletin 104, by permission - all rights reserved)
[click on thumbnailed picture for a much larger image)

This photo of three of Singer's four locos, #1, #2, and #4, was taken on 24 Jul 1915 and is reproduced here with the specific written permission of the Central Electric Railfans' Association (CERA) from page IV-25 of their Bulletin 104 (it was scanned and lightened from a xerocopy of a screened, printed photo).

A history of the Singer plant and more photos are on Tom Kepshire's Monon site.  Here, with Tom's kind permission, is an old photo of the plant:

SingerPlant
(photo from T. Kepshire's Monon site, by permission - all rights reserved)
[click on thumbnailed picture for larger image)

With the exception of one end of one building, it's all gone now.  You can see what are now the Conrail tracks in the upper right corner.

All I have to do now is to remember to stop in Noblesville the next time I drive across the country!


See also the Electric Boxcabs page, et seq.


There are now more than seventy (70) BOXCAB pages;
see the main Boxcabs page and the Boxcabs INDEX.


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THUMBS UP!

THUMBS UP!  -  Support your local police, fire, and emergency personnel!


S. Berliner, III

To contact S. Berliner, III, please click here.



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To tour the Boxcabs pages in sequence, the arrows take you from the previous page to the Boxcabs index, to the first Boxcabs page, to continuation pages 1 and up, then 100-tonner LIRR #401 and her sisters, survivor boxcabs (with map) and survivor notes, survivor CNJ #1000 (the very first), Ingersoll-Rand boxcabs (with instruction manual), other (non-ALCo/GE/I-R) boxcabs, Baldwin-Westinghouse boxcabs, odd boxcabs, and finally model boxcabs.

{Not inserted into the Boxcabs Tour sequence, yet.}



© Copyright S. Berliner, III - 2008  - All rights reserved.


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