S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com CHRYSLER Continuation Page 7 keywords = Chrysler Walter Daimler ChryslerDaimler auto car truck tank Crown Imperial Majestic Highlander Royal Saratoga Windsor Newport Town & Country Thunderbolt turbine engine Willys Overland Jeep Dodge DeSoto Plymouth Valiant Tourismo Chalmers Maxwell Briscoe Fargo Aberdeen Proving Ground Gander Gyról Fluid Drive M4 Vacamatic M6 Prestomatic

Updated:   19 Jul 2012, 13:45  ET
[Page created 26 Dec 2009; converted 25 Oct 2011;

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/chryslr7.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/chryslr7.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I have been scrambling to transfer everything.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

CHRYSLER

Continuation Page 7

Chrysler Badge

(The original Chrysler page, et seq., grew completely out of hand and this had to be added;
please have a look at it, the Chrysler Continuation Page 1, the Chrysler Continuation Page 2,
the Chrysler Continuation Page 3, the Chrysler Continuation Page 4,
the Chrysler Continuation Page 5, the Chrysler Continuation Page 6,
this Chrysler Continuation Page 7, and the Chrysler Continuation Page 8!)

These pages are basically unindexed but a HELP section is now on the continuation page 3 and the Chrysler Links section is being recreated.

Chrysler Imperial 8.

  '31-'32-'33 Imperial 8 Major Model Year Differences.

plus much more on Cont. Page 4.

Imperial L-80/L*80 - the "Big Six".

Jeep (moved to Chrysler page 1 on 02 Jul .

Model Chryslers.

On Chrysler Continuation Page 5:
    '39 and '41 Photos - moved to this page on 11 Nov 03.
    Miscellaneous Chrysler Photos - moved to this page on 11 Nov 03.
    Dodge Power Wagon.

On Chrysler Continuation Page 6:
    Gyról Fluid Drive and
    M4 Vacamatic and M6 Prestomatic Semi-Automatic Transmissions
    1930 Chrysler Pickup Truck!
    1929 Chrysler Pickup Truck!!!
    Odd 1940 Chrysler

On this Chrysler Continuation Page 7:
    1931 CG Imperial 8 Limousine (moved there 26 Dec 09).
    1931 CG Imperial 8 Sedans (moved there 26 Dec 09).

On Chrysler Continuation Page 8:   new (25 Oct 2011)
    '31 Imperial 8 CG Close coupled Sedan - "Old Betsey".   new (25 Oct 2011)
    '49 Highlander (New Yorker) C-46 Straight 8 Club Coupé.   new (25 Oct 2011)

On separate page - 1949 Chrysler 8 C-46 Owner's Manual


Chrysler and Daimler (Mercedes) merged as DaimlerChrysler in 1998 and split back apart in 2007 - two of my most favo(u)rite cars!


HELP! - What is the approved substitute for Gýrol Fluid Drive coupling fluid? (14 May 2008)


note-rt.gif - [This page vanished mysteriously and the backup copy was reformatted by some fiendish unknown program,
so I have laboriously recreated it as I think it was intended to look (25 Oct 2011).]


Jan Stiefel of Switzerland (great country for old Imperials, eh?) owns his grandfather's 1931 CG Chrysler Imperial 8 Limousine!  Here it is in front of the main gate of Grandpapa's brewery in a historic building, ca. 1936-37 or so:

31CGLimo
(Ca. 1936 photo courtesy of J. Stiefel - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed image - click on picture for larger image]

The Stiefel family has owned the car since 1931.  It does have the partition window, which is what makes it a limousine; you can see the upper frame through the left windshield on the photo.  The car came right from the factory complete in a huge crate, as Jan's father told him.  The only major modification ever was the sliding canvas sunroof visible in the picture; it was an addition by the Swiss coachbuilder, Gangloff, made soon after the car's arrival.  This was the fashion in Switzerland at the time.

A question arises - the 7-passenger sedan and the limo had fancy chromium-plated spare tire covers - did only Imperial limousines and some custom Imperials have this feature?  Another is what happened to the "bedspring" radio antenna, which was "woven" into the underside of the original fabric roof panel?

If a car has a partition window, which is normally fitted onto or into the back of the front seat and has either horizontally sliding twin panels or winds up and down into the back of the seat, it is a limousine.  This car body is a "standard" factory body by Briggs; it bears no builder's plates other than the one referring to the sliding roof (Gangloff Genève).  Did Briggs install the partition window(s)?

Another distinction which might apply is that production '31 CGs bore the small gazelle while only custom cars had the large one.  Of course, some owners replaced the small one with the large one, back then or later on.  This car still has the original small gazelle.

Unlike most limos of the time, with a "speaking tube" to the driver's position, the 1931 Imperial 8 limo is equipped with a telephone-like microphone installed for the passengers to give instructions to the driver when the dividing window was up/closed; the one in this car had been deactivated when the sliding roof was installed, but Jan remembers it well (it was also stolen in the sixties).  The mike and speaker ("telephone transmitter" and "telephone receiver") are shown on the electrical wiring diagram the Stiefels still have.

    [I will have to check out the one I have squirrelled away electronically somewhere.]

Jan asks the question, "who knows another owner of this model?"  Are there ANY other surviving 1931 CG Chrysler Imperial 8 limousines?

[Yes (maybe)!  Famed author Clive Cussler's Cussler Museum in Arvada (Denver area), Colorado, features what is listed as a "1931 Chrysler Imperial Limousine" but appears to be a 1932.]   added (19 Jul 2012)

Jan sent along these additional shots of the car; two taken at night of the left side and of the interior showing (incontrovertibly) the wind-up partition window and one of the vases, and one from 2005 of the block just before it was sent back to the U.S. for restoration:

31CGLimoNight 31CGLimoInterior 31CGLimoBlock
(Nov 2009 left side and interior and 2005 block photos
courtesy of J. Stiefel - all rights reserved)
[cropped thumbnailed images left and center - click on pictures for larger images]

Jan also added the following information:

"The body has a number on a placard on the firewall.  It reads 'Body Number L- 156 -C.G. Chrysler Motors', The 156 is stamped in, the rest is printed."  He assumes the "L" may refer to "limousine"; I wonder if it isn't rather a continuation of the L-80 Imperial numbering series.

"The engine number is stamped in on the upper left side of the engine and reads 'CG 2940'. -studying your notes on engine block cast numbers, I checked and found the figure 11 3 30 in the location where the date would be.  This would mean 3 November 1930, which seems to be coherent with body and engine numbers, say, that the car itself would come out of somewhere in mid-series.  I enclose picture of the block before shipment to the US in 2005 for a major repair.  The cast number is the same as on your specimens."

" - - - you see the car as it stood a few days ago, radiator cap and wheel caps removed.  For the dividing window I took a shot that also shows the vases, and the corner lamps in the passenger compartment.  As you see, all fabric is original.  We do not want to replace it but rather hope for some technology to emerge which allows some kind of rejuvenating."  [Does anyone out there have a "magic formula"?]

My memory may be playing tricks on me but I seem to recall polished wood holders for crystal vases in my Close-Coupled Sedan back in the inner quarters near where the corner lamps are in the limo.  Flower vases for the chauffeur, however égalitarian, seems a wee bit odd to me.

Per my request, Jan took a picture of the interior; you can see the lowered partition window, with its crank, and the top of one of the jump (or "dickey" or "occasional") seats, the liner under the sliding roof, the crank for the roof, and the instrument panel:

31CGLimoInsideRear
(Dec 2009 interior photo courtesy of J. Stiefel - all rights reserved)
[thumbnailed image - click on picture for larger image]

Because there is such a wealth of detail here, I cropped and lightened the left rear door and the partition areas so you can see them more readily:

31CGLimoLRDoor 31CGLimoPartition
(cropped and lightened from Dec 2009 interior photo courtesy of J. Stiefel - all rights reserved)
[click on thumbnailed right picture for larger image]

You can see the beautiful detailing of the door and the partition, the top crank above the center post, and the braided rug/robe rope.  The latter was used both to hold a lap robe and to assist in entering and leaving; some cars of the era (Chryslers and Dodges, among others) had a sculptured metal railing instead of a rope.  The top crank saw heavy use winding back that huge top and eventually failed at the "D"-nut; it was replaced and Jan has carefully saved the original, which matches the door crank.

On some 7-passenger cars and limousines, the jump seats folded into recesses in the floor or the rear of the front seat; this car body is so long that there was no need for such artifices.

Again at my request, a Christmas present, as it were, Jan took detail shots of the rear window shade and the jump seats (in the up and down positions):

31CGLimoRearShade 31CGLimoJumpSeats
(Dec 2009 interior photos courtesy of J. Stiefel - all rights reserved)
[thumbnailed images - click on pictures for larger images]

They are just as I remembered; the '31 CG Close-Coupled Sedan had the same shade, two-toned, with a tasseled pull, and held in place by two fine guide ropes, and the jump seats are very much the same as in other limos and 7-passenger sedans, folding into wells in the floor and up against the partition (in shorter bodies without partitions, they fold into the back of the front seat).


The definition of a limousine (having a partition window) brought up the question of how does one distinguish the differences between the various 1931 CG Imperial 8 sedan bodies?  Happily, Chrysler sales literature of the day most definitively answers that; here are the renderings of the close-coupled, "standard" 5-passenger, and 7-passenger sedans:

31CGCCpldSedan
31CG5PassSedan
31CG7PassSedan
(1931 Chrysler sales brochure images from SB,III collection - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed images - click on pictures for larger images]

You can readily discern the differences, viewing the three body types together, the short close-coupled sedan body, the medium-length 5-passenger sedan body, and the long 7-passenger sedan body.  The close-coupled sedan had a large trunk (boot) between the rear fenders (wings) and no quarter window.  The 5-passenger sedan had some space between the rear of the body and the folded luggage rack and a short quarter window.  The 7-passenger sedan had almost no space between the rear of the body and the folded luggage rack and a long quarter window.  The factory (works) limousine shared the same body as the 7-passenger sedan, but with the addition of the interior partition window.



(The original Chrysler page, et seq., grew completely out of hand and this had to be added;
please have a look at it, the Chrysler Continuation Page 1, the Chrysler Continuation Page 2,
the Chrysler Continuation Page 3, the Chrysler Continuation Page 4,
the Chrysler Continuation Page 5, the Chrysler Continuation Page 6,
this Chrysler Continuation Page 7, and the Chrysler Continuation Page 8!)



Cyclops fans; see Cyclops on my Automotive page!


LEGACY

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