S. Berliner, III's Long Island Rail Road Page 10 keywords = rail road way Long Island LIRR DE30AC DM30AC steam diesel boxcab locomotive restoration Pennsylvania Pennsy PRR Kiesel Berlinerwerke Vest Pocket Degnon Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal BEDT New York Atlantic Cross Harbor Dock Black River Western

Updated:   17 Mar 2015,  23:00  ET
[Page converted 31 Aug 2012; created 28 Aug 2006

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/lirr10.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/lirr10.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I have been scrambling to transfer everything.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

Long Island Rail Road Page 10

RAILROADING



LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD

continued

(and related Long Island railroad information) LIRR Keystone

[this page was separated out from my RAILROAD, LI Rail Road, and LI Railroads pages;
you might wish to see them also.]


NOTE:  Page size was limited by HTML to some 30kB; thus, I was forced to add this continuation page to fit the LIRR and related information, as well as several other continuation pages.
You may wish to visit my RR page, as well.

Also, LILS - the Long Island Live Steamers courtesy page had to be moved to a separate page.


There are two related topics here on these pages:
(1) The Long Island Rail Road and (2) Long Island railroad information.

There IS a difference!

The Long Island Rail Road is the official name of the oldest Class 1 railroad still operating under its original name and charter (the B&O was older but has been subsumed into CSX).  Although there remain some offical documents with the two words combined, the correct name of the LIRR has the two words separately, "Long Island Rail Road"!

There were and are other railroads on Long Island - these also are (or will be) covered on the LI Railroads page.


INDEX:

If these links don't work, click "back" and scroll down!

NOTE:  To conserve space, I have severely truncated the index on this page; see the LIRR index page.

ALCO-GE-IR BOXCABS
    including LIRR boxcabs #401, the world's first production diesel road switcher,
    #402 (first and second), #403, and many others.

Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Railroad,
    and its successor roads, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad and New York Regional Rail.

Degnon Terminal Railroad, etc.

MODEL RAILROADING

On the (first) LIRR page:
    Long Island Sunrise-Trail Chapter (National Railway Historical Society)
    Sunrise Trail Division (Northeastern Region, National Model Railroad Association)
    Steam Locomotive #35 Restoration Committee

(Friends of Locomotive #35 Incorporated)
Restoration of Pennsy Class G5 Long Island Rail Road 4-6-0 #35
    Steam Locomotive #39 Restoration
(Railroad Museum of Long island)
Restoration of Pennsy Class G5 Long Island Rail Road 4-6-0 #39

On LIRR Continuation Page 1a:
    LIRR FIRSTS
    LIRR BIBLIOGRAPHY

On the LIRR Continuation Page 2:

    Odd Incident at Wreck Lead (on the LIRR)
    LIRR and LI Railroad Miscellany
    Converted LIRR HEP/Cab Control Units
    Central RR of LI - moved to this page 5 on 17 Dec 00

and now to a separate CRR of LI page on 17 Feb 2002.
    Dashing Dan and Dottie.

On the LIRR Continuation Page 3:
    Nassau County Police 2nd Pct. Booth D/Locust Tower
    Victorian Stations Still Standing on the LIRR

On the LIRR Continuation Page 4:
    Blissville and Laurel Hill Sidings, Maspeth Yard, and Fresh Pond Yard

and NY&AR/NYCRR Interchange info.
    LIRR MISCELLANY - continued
    LIRR HELP

On the LIRR Continuation Page 5:
    Central RR of LI - moved to separate CRR page on 17 Feb 02.
    LIRR DE30AC and DM30AC Locomotives
    Victorian LIRR Stations (continued)

Locust Valley Station
Glen Street Station (update)
Oyster Bay Station (moved to LIRR page 7 on 23 Sep 02)

On the LIRR Continuation Page 6:
    Nassau County Police 2nd Pct. Booth D/Locust Tower (cont'd)

On the LIRR Continuation Page 7:
    Victorian LIRR Stations (continued from LIRR pages 2 and 5)

Oyster Bay Station (moved from LIRR page 5 on 23 Sep 02)
Oyster Bay Station Photos
Oyster Bay Station Dimensions

On the LIRR Continuation Page 8:
    Victorian LIRR Stations (continued from LIRR pages 2, 5, and 7)

More on Oyster Bay Station (moved from LIRR page 5 on 23 Sep 02)
More Oyster Bay Station Photos
More Oyster Bay Station Dimensions

On the LIRR Continuation Page 9:

Glen Head Station ca. 1925
LIRR P54 "Ping Pong" Car Baggage Racks
LIRR VW Railbuses
LIRR on the FGC

On this LIRR Continuation Page 10:

The Death of PD Tower.
The Branch (Five Towns).
    Mystery Right-of-Way.

On the LIRR Continuation Page 11:   new (09 Dec 2014)

Long Island City Trip (ca. 2002?).   movedhere (31 Aug 2012)
LIRR Photo Album in the 1907 Convention Issue of the Electric Railway Journal.,
        in turn in Traction Heritage, Vol. 4, No. 12:   new (09 Dec 2014)

On the LIRR Continuation Page 11:

Long Island City Trip (ca. 2002?).   movdhere (09 Dec 2014)
LIRR Photo Album in the 1907 Convention Issue of the Electric Railway Journal.,
        in turn in Traction Heritage, Vol. 4, No. 12:   new (09 Dec 2014)

LIRR Class MP41 All-Steel Motorized Electric Passenger Car (1905) Page,
        with 1906 and 1911 text, dimensioned drawings, and photographs.   new.gif (08 Feb 2014) and rev.gif (08 Feb 2014)
  Street Railway Journal, Vol. XXVIII, No. 6, 11 Aug 1906:
    All eleven full pages, 216-226,
    Drawings, Figures 1 through 7 and 10 and 11.
    Detailed sections of drawings, Figures 1, 4, 5, and 10.
    Photographs, Figures 8 and 9 and 12 through 16.
  NYCTA Drawings of the 1904 Gibbs IRT Subway Car.   added.gif (09 Dec 2014)
  Street Railway Journal, 1911, (in Traction Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1) -
    New Steel Motor Cars of the Long Island Railroad {sic}.   added.gif (09 Dec 2014)

On the Central RR of LI Page:
    Central RR of LI - moved 17 Dec 00,

and again on 17 Feb 02 to a separate CRR of LI page.

Salisbury Plains Station ca. 1973
(Salisbury Plains Station on the LIRR Central Branch ca. 1973.)
[Cropped from photograph courtesy of A. Huneke - all rights reserved.]

    Bethpage Branch.

On the LI Railroads Continuation Page:
    Long Island Railroads [with a link to the NYCRR (Hell Gate)]

On separate pages:

Long Island Live Steamers

The New York & Atlantic Railway, lessor of LIRR freight operations.

Railroad Eagles - Penn Station, Grand Central Terminal, etc.

Long Island Rail Road Historical Society.


Long Island Live Steamers (LILS)

A great group of miniature live steam (and diesel and electric) operators running at mostly 1½" scale (also some 1" and rare 3/4") in Southaven Park at the intersection of William Floyd Parkway (Suffolk County Route 46) and Sunrise Highway (U.S. Route 27); their site with their PUBLIC RUNNING SCHEDULE and some other live steam links, has been moved to a separate page.


The Death of PD Tower.

On top of losing the East Williston station and the LI (Vanderbilt) Motor Parkway dormitory (a John Russell Pope masterpiece), we now have lost PD Tower in Patchogue!  These photos (courtesy of former LIRR Branch Manager Dave Morrison, were taken 22 Aug 2006 by Patchogue Ticket Agent Terry Peluso; PD Tower is now history:

PDTower01 PDTower05
[Thumbnailed pictures - click on images for larger pictures]
(22 Aug 06 photos by T. Peluso - all rights reserved)

PDTower04 PDTower06

PDTower10 PDTower03

PDTower02 PDTower07

PDTower09 PDTower08
[Thumbnailed pictures - click on images for larger pictures]
(22 Aug 06 photos by T. Peluso - all rights reserved)

[These photos are apparently not numbered in the sequence in which they were taken
so I have re-ordered them as seems appropriate based on stages of destruction and cloud movement;
if anyone has the sequence down better, please let me know and I'll correct it.]


The Branch (Five Towns)

Thanks to best-buddy Art Huneke (of aRRt's aRRchives) and his massive collection of LIRR photos and ephemera, I am able to show you a whole slew of 1939 photos of The Branch, where I grew up half of each summer from ca. 1937 through 1944 and full-time from 1945 through 1951.  The Branch, applying equally to the geographical Rockaway Peninsula ("The Pensinsula") and the Five Towns thereon (Inwood, Lawrence, Cedarhurst, Woodmere, and Hewlett), and to the LIRR from Far Rockaway to Valley Stream, is actually the entire area between Far Rockaway and Lynbrook.

Aside from the pure nostalgia of these photos for me, personally, they are also an invaluable record of the trackage and ancillaries of the time.  A note on the geographical terminology is in order, however.  The LIRR ran NE from Far Rock. to Hewlett, with only a moderate curve just before the Inwood station, a very shallow curve at the Lawrence station, and thence almost die-straight to Hewlett, before curving mightily just slightly W of N to meet the South Shore line at Valley Stream.  Art notes that "we must use geographic directions.  At first trains for Rockaway Beach were eastward.  Sometime after the trestle opened, eastward trains ran to Rockaway Park and Valley Stream via Far Rock.  They changed direction and train number at Valley until the trestle fire, then reverted to eastward to Far Rock. and Rock. Park".  I shall stick to purely-geographical terms herein; rather than belabor all this, here is an old map of the area:

CedarhurstCa60
(Ca. 1960 map of Cedarhurst)

The map is postwar, ca. 1960, because the then-new Lawrence (shown as Elderd) H. S, at upper left, on the grounds of the former Cedarhurst Stadium, wasn't built until that year, when the old H.S. (mine) became the Middle School.  Note that the old trackage is still on the map, even though it was long-gone by 1960.   new.gif (03 Sep 2012)

I lived near, and played in, Cedarhurst Park, between Oak and Summit Avenues on the SW side of Cedarhurst Avenue, just NW of Cedarhurst Station.  What hit me even at an early age were the traces of two (what I now know were) abandoned RR lines, one of which (red line) was merely a dirt path which ran from the N side of the flagpole in the park (red dot) and curved northward onto Linwood Avenue while the other (blue line), which may even have had rails before WWII, paralleled the first from the Cedarhurst Avenue crossing and up between Linwood and Oakwood Avenue.  Here's a detail of that area:

CedarhurstDetail
(Detail map of Cedarhurst by and © 2012 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

[This map should be completely re-drawn!  I'm reasonably sure that the curved track/blue line* is the old New York & Rockaway RR
(the Cedarhurst Cut-off) but can't remember, or find, what RR the red line represents (how embarassing)!
It is definitely NOT the Cedarhurst Railway, which ran from Woodsburgh/Woodmere to the Rockaway Hunt Club.
See * - MYSTERY RoW, below.]
  new.gif (03 Sep 2012)

The black dot marked "III" is my house on Leroy Avenue (some intervening streets have been omitted), the black dot marked "5" is #5 School, where I attended 7th and 8th grades.  The green dot is Cedarhurst Station and the blue dot is the LIRR Sub-Station across Chestnut Street from the station.  Once I finished grade school, I normally biked W from my house to Rockaway Turnpike, turned S and crossed the tracks, and pedaled SW along a woggly dirt path on the SE side of the tracks to Lawrence station, from whence I zig-zagged southerly to Lawrence High School.  In those days, Lawrence had the highest per-capita income in the U. S. and directly across the tracks from the Lawrence station lay Inwood [formerly Northwest Point (Cedarhurst was originally Ocean Point)], which some called North Lawrence to be fancy, which may well have had one of the lowest (quite literally the "wrong side of the tracks" to some).   rev.gif (03 Sep 2012)

Here then, from Inwood to Lawrence to Cedarhurst, are the photos; all the photos were captioned and many notched (apparently they were once in an album - the ones of Cedarhurst were subsequently PhotoShopped to fill in the notched areas) - comments by (or based on) Art Huneke, unless noted by me:

Inwood39/98
(#98 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Inwood39/100
(#100 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Inwood39/104
(#104 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Inwood39/105
(#105 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Lawrence39/59
(#59 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Lawrence39/81
(#81 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Lawrence39/86
(#86 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Lawrence39/92
(#92 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

In the views south of the Cedarhurst station, you can clearly see the abandoned South Shore RR of LI RoW and the pole line at the perimeter of their property.  That branch had so much freight there was a third track from Cedarhurst {to be checked} to Far Rock.  People used to burn a form of carbon called coal; there were a LOT of coal yards.  Fifty-seven years ago coal was the LIRR's number one freight product, back when John L. Lewis reigned!

Cedarhurst39/1
(#01 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
Cedarhurst Avenue crossing in 1939; note the Sub-Station and note, in the surface of the road, signs of the Cedarhurst Cut-Off track which had been removed in 1935.  Also, check out the location of the crossing sign!

Cedarhurst39/2
[Thumbnailed picture - click on image for larger picture]
(#02 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Looking geographically west - the Cedarhurst Cut-Off RoW is clearly visible.

Cedarhurst39/3
(#03 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
"Old Freight House Cedarhurst"

Cedarhurst39/5
(#05 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
"Old Express House Cedarhurst" looking north.
There's my woggly bike path!

Cedarhurst39/6
(#06 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
"Freight Yard Cedarhurst" looking south.

Cedarhurst39/8
(#08 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
"So. of Washington Ave. Cedarhurst" looking south {it says here!}

Cedarhurst39/9
(#09 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
Here's Linwood Avenue, operated from Cedarhurst Avenue.

Cedarhurst39/10
(#10 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
In view geographically east, note the Cut-Off RoW and a concrete fence post;
note the extra stanchion for operating the gates at Linwood Avenue.

Cedarhurst39/11
[#11 - Thumbnailed picture - click on image for larger picture]
(1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)

Linwood Avenue looking west - check out the RoW.

Cedarhurst39/12
(#12 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
Looking South at Linwood - clearly shows the change from the ROW of the SSRR to that of the LIRR's NY&R{ockaway}RR.

Cedarhurst39/15
(#15 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
Looking west at Grove - note the extra stanchion for gates at Prospect.

Cedarhurstd39/PR1
(#PR1 - 1939 photo from the collection, and courtesy, of A. Huneke - all rights reserved)
Looking south at Prospect.

THANK YOU, Art!

I remembered a framed picture of my first sister, Jo Patricia (Patsy) Berliner, 1935-1940, sitting on the base of the flagpole in Cedarhurst Park and, amazingly, found it; here she is in the summer of 1938, with her jointed wooden toy, in a view that appears to be facing compass E:

PatCedPk39
[Thumbnailed picture - click on image for larger picture]
(1938 photo from the collection of and © 2007 S. Berliner, III, - all rights reserved)

Patsy Berliner at Cedarhurst Park - Summer 1938

The old RoW curved in from the left and fetched up at the base.

This was scanned through the glass of the frame and shows a car heading NW (community N or RR W) across the tracks on Cedarhurst Avenue, with buildings on the NE corner of Cedarhurst Avenue across Chestnut Street in the background beyond one of those same tapered light poles with the white glass globes you can see in the park across Summit Street in picture 02 above:

CedPk39
(enlarged from 1938 photo from the collection of and © 2007 S. Berliner, III, - all rights reserved)

The sub-station would have been off to the right, facing my mom or whoever took the photo.

To highlight the tapered light poles in the park in 1938 for reference, here's an enlargement of image 02 above:

CedPkPoles
(2012 enlargement of left side of 1938 photo from the collection of and © 2007/2012 S. Berliner, III, - all rights reserved)

* - This brings us back to the mystery right of way (RoW).  Some of us LIRR historians seem to have a concensus that the RoW between Linwood and Oakwood is the old New York & Rockaway RR, (the Cedarhurst Cut-off) but then what is the "red" line, the one that fetched up at the base of the flagpole in the park?  On eof thoise I consulted was Dave Keller, who kindly furnished one of Bob Emery's great track maps, MP 20 to MP21, effective Oct 1958:   new.gif (03 Sep 2012)

EmeryCedMap
[Thumbnailed picture - click on image for larger picture]
(map drawn by Robert M. Emery, from the archives of, and reproduced here by the express permission of, David Keller - all rights reserved)

Bob clearly shows the two RoWs of the NY&R (the Cut-off); they represent the original 1872 line and the 1905 NY&R/Jamaica & South Shore RR realignment (dates per Seyfried, Vol. 7, Chap. XIII, pp. 167-173) or the double trackage.  So, what about "my" red line?  Let's overlay it on Bob Emery's map:

EmeryCedMap
[Thumbnailed picture - click on image for larger picture]
(SB,III overlay on map drawn by Robert M. Emery, from the archives of, and reproduced here by the express permission of, David Keller - all rights reserved)

Dave suggests it may have been a trolley line RoW.  Vince Seyfried describes a 1904 "railroad 'war"" when the New York & Long Island Traction tried to force a crossing at grade.  The dispute was resolved (although a second "war' erupted, over property rights, that stalled progress through 1907).  So, it may well be that my "mystery" RoW is the NY&SS trolley line.

The NY&R/J&SS only ran for a few years (1872-1877) before it was laft to lie fallow; after it was resurrected in 1907-1910, it never saw any service at all!  All that hooraw for absolutely nothing.

Can anyone shed any further, definitive light on this matter of the "red" line RoW?

WOW!  How memory floods back!  Looking at image 02 again (enlarged):

CedAvXing
(2012 enlargement of right side of 1938 photo from the collection of and © 2007/2012 S. Berliner, III, - all rights reserved)

I realized that the gate controller (stanchion) closest to the camera (at right) may well have been the one for either the pedestrian walkway across the tracks in front of the station, where a sliding gate allowed access through the fence between the tracks, or the gates at Linwood.  I well remember that there were two handles that rotated in opposite directions and were kept in position by a steel shackle shaped like a figure eight (an infinity sign, really - ) that was highly polished on its inner surfaces from constant use and movement by the wind on the gates.  The gates used to bounce up and down after they crashed against the pavement.  I also remember how the handles moved of their own accord, in flywheel fashion, once they got going.  In addition, that gateman's shanty is the very one that I mention(ed) elsewhere as sprouting a very tall TV antenna ca. 1946, long before most people's homes did!   new.gif (06 Sep 2012)


LONG ISLAND CITY TRIP - moved to LIRR Page 11
[this link vanished with some reference to "Kills", probably "Dutch Kills"; the link is restored]   rev (17 Mar 2015)



[This page was separated out from my RAILROAD, LI Rail Road, and LI Railroads pages;
you might wish to see them also.]



You may wish to visit the Railroad Continuation Page, et seq.

nextpage.gif
of this series of Railroad pages.


LEGACY

  What happens to all this when I DIE or (heaven forfend!) lose interest?  See LEGACY.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

See Copyright Notice on primary home page.



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prevpage.gif subjndex.gif frstpage.gif nextpage.gif
of this series of LIRR pages.

To tour the Long Island railroads pages in sequence, the arrows take you from the previous page to the LIRR index, to the first LIRR page, and on to pages 2 and up, then to the other LI railroads page, and lastly to the LIRR Historical Society page.



© Copyright S. Berliner, III - 2006, 2007, 2012, 2014, 2015  - all rights reserved.


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