S. Berliner, III's Marion River Carry Railroad Continuation Page 2 keywords = Marion River Carry Railroad module model Adirondack Raquette Blue Mountain Utowanna Eagle lake rail train Vest Pocket

Updated:   25 Mar 2016; 15:00  ET
[Page created 29 Oct 2013>

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/marionr2.html

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I have been scrambling to transfer everything.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

Marion River Carry Railroad
Continuation Page 2


MARION RIVER CARRY RAILROAD
(continued from SB,III's MARION RIVER CARRY RR Page 1)

INDEX

[To conserve space, this index has been truncated by removing some detail links;
go to the pages indicated - they are each indexed fully.]

On the main Marion River Carry Railroad page:

    Marion River Carry Railroad - moved to this page on 02 May 02.
    Richard Sanders Allen's "The Carry Railroad"

On the Marion River Carry Railroad continuation page 1:

    Turnouts.
    1902 Survey Map.

On this Marion River Carry Railroad continuation page 2:

    Modules.

On the MAIN Model RR page:

    Sunrise Trail Division (STD) of the
        Northeastern Region (NER) of the
        National Model Railroad Association (NMRA)
    Long Island - Sunrise Trail Chapter (LIST) of the
        National Railway Historical Society (NRHS)
    Long Island Live Steamers     and model railroading miscellany at the end.

On the mrr page 2:

    Vest Pocket Railroads You Can Model:

Marion River Carry Railroad - moved to this page on 02 May 02.

Degnon Terminal Railroad, plus
    Murrer's Sidings
    Kearney Sidings
    as well as (on an LIRR page):
  Blissville/Laurel Hill,
Blissville Sidings
Laurel Hill Sidings
    and Maspeth and Fresh Pond -
Maspeth Yard
Fresh Pond Yard

The Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Railroad segment was moved to its own separate page on 07 Sep 99.

New York & Atlantic Railway.

On MRR Continuation Page 3:

Model Railroading Miscellany
PRR/Wrong Island #007 Cabin Car
Garden Railway Scales
Making a Stacker from a Front End Loader
Berlinerwerke-ALCo RSD-1m
Model Railroading HELP!

On MRR Continuation Page 4:

Great Northern/Western Fruit Express Reefers -
    (moved to MRR page 4 on 07 May 01).
Railroad Grades
Model Railroad Photgraphy
More Model Railroad Miscellany, with
    Hobbytown of Boston (Bear Locomotive Co.).

On Z-Scale pages:

    Z-Scale
    Z-Scale Narrow Gauge (really)
    Scale and Gauge
    Scale Conversion Table
    Ztrack Magazine
    Z-Scale Miscellany
    Z-Scale Wiring Conventions
    Z-Scale Vehicles and Märklin Rubber Autos
    and much more on Page 2 and noted below.
    Sub-Z-Scale Page with
Half-Z Scale - 1:440 Tiny Trains and even 1:900 Tiniest Trains!

[To conserve space even further, the index for material on separate pages has been removed; see the main model RR page.]


Visit the courtesy and official home pages listed in the index on the main MRR page.


You may also wish to jump to SB,III's RAILROAD Page.


MARION RIVER CARRY RAILROAD

A VEST POCKET RAILROAD
YOU CAN MODEL
(continued)

MARION RIVER CARRY RAILROAD

(Continuation Page 2)

MRCRR
Photo courtesy of the Adirondack Museum

H. K. PORTER 0-4-0T LOCOMOTIVE No. 2 ON DISPLAY AT THE
ADIRONDACK MUSEUM,
BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE, NEW YORK

This is one fantastic museum and well worth a trip to the heart of the Adirondacks!

A lot of historical information about the Marion River Carry Railroad is also available on the website of The Church of The Good Shepherd, on St. Hubert's Isle in Raquette Lake.


As noted, the Marion River Carry Railroad may well have been the shortest standard-gauge passenger line in history and certainly had one of the smallest standard-gauge steam locomotives built in the 20th Century.  The Marion River is one of the waterways in the Fulton Chain of Lakes system running diagonally east-northeast in New York State's Adirondack Mountains from near Utica through Raquette Lake to Blue Mountain Lake (the Eckford Lakes).  Since this all started out as an extension of the model railroading subject Vest Pocket Railroads You Can Model, let us now address just how that might be accomplshed in the various popular model railroad scales.

First of all, in order to understand the question of "SCALE" vs. "GAUGE", I refer you to my Scale Conversion page.  Excerpting from that the most common/popular scales, plus my own favorite micro-mini-scales (TY, T, ½Z, and Z), we come up with the following:

SCALE		TY	T	½Z	Z	N	TT	HO	OO	S	O	1	G	Maxi	¾	1"	1½"
Proportion	900	450	440	220	160	128	87.1	76.2	64	48	36	32	22.5	16	12	9
  (1:X)
===============================================================================================================================================
¼-mile		1.467'	2.933'	3'	6'	8¼'	10.313'	15.155'	17.323'	20.625'	27½'	36.667'	41¼'	58.667'	82½'	110'	146.667'
½-mile		2.933'	5.867'	6'	12'	16½'	20.625'
¾-mile		4.4'	8.8'	9'	18'	24¾'	45.465'
1 mile		5.867'	11.733'	12'	24'	33'	41¼'	60.620'
===============================================================================================================================================
SCALE		TY	T	½Z	Z	N	TT	HO	OO	S	O	1	Maxi	G	¾	1"	1½"
Proportion	900	450	440	220	160	128	87.1	76	64	48	36	32	22.5	16	12	9
  (1:X)

Note:  HO scale of 1:87.1 used for calculations; actual scale is 1:87.08571428571------.
Naturally, since we are interested here in the Marion River Carry Railroad,which is/was, to all intents and purposes, just over THREE-QUARTERS (¾) of a mile long [more like seven-eighths (⅞) of a mile], let us consider modules in convenient lengths (and depths) in each scale.

note-rt What follows regarding modules may be ignored if one is reproducing the Marion River Carry Railroad as a free-standing layout; connections to other modules are only of significance if one postulates mythical rail access to the Carry (there never was any rail connection to the outside world).

HO-scale modules are usually 2' by 4'.

N scale modules are usually 2', 4', 6', or 8' long and 2' deep.

Z-scale modules can be any length but are specified to be 2' (24") deep.

Examining the extract from the 1902 Survey Map that Larry Miller sent me (see 1902 ta the entire Survey Map), whereon distances are given in "chs." (chains), reproduced here:

Marion River Carry Map extract
(image courtesy of L. Miller - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed image, click on picture for MUCH larger (2.3Mb) image]

You can note that the property lines at the north and south of the lot are 50 chs. long.  "chs."?  "chs." = "chains".  So, you may ask, "what's a chain?"

Well, according to Wikipedia (etc.), a chain is a unit of length measuring 66 feet, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 m).  There are 10 chains in a furlong, and 80 chains in one statute mile.  An acre is the area of 10 square chains (that is, an area of one chain by one furlong).

Now you know.

50 chains, therefore, equals 3,300'.  I added the N-S dimensions (5.55 + 15 + 44.45) to get 65 chains or 4,290'.  Similarly all the boundary dimensions in chains can simply be multipled by 66 to get feet.

[Again as noted previously, the demarcation of the township boundaries in the upper left is an old "Nickle {sic} Plate in Rock. / Marked N. Y. State Land Survey. / Verplanck Colvin Sup't.", the primary survey of the Adirondack Park done by Colvin ca. 1872!]

I cropped the image down to a more reasonable size (1.6Mb), from dock to dock:

Marion River Carry Map - scaled
(cropped from image courtesy of L. Miller - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed image, click on picture for larger (426Kb) image]

So, the scale of the map is such that I could only add a meaningful scale bar in 100' increments:

For the nonce, we will ignore the question of turnouts.

In the larger scales, one may wish to straighten out some of the major curves, especially the one at the bridge, or to make the layout a corner module (or modules).

It's roughly 2,400' from the Upper Carry dock to the bridge and roughly 2,000' from the bridge to the Lower Carry dock, giving a 4,400' overall length or 0.833 miles - more than close enough to the ⅞ of a mile (0.875 mi.) of legend.

To be more accurate (as if it mattered), one would have to walk out the track on the map with an imaginary microscopic 1' tape or dividers or my old map wheel (assuming I can find it) and I may yet do just that.

Let's first redraw the map to minimize the surround and place a rough minimum area on it to encompass the vital features of the Carry:

Marion River Carry Module min
(cropped from image courtesy of L. Miller - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed image, click on picture for larger (870Kb) image]

The precison of the outline dimensions is a joke, of course; just the five-pixel line weight outline alone is coarser than that fractional finesse!  However you cut it, though, the dimensions translate into minimum module sizes as follows:
SCALE				TY	T	½Z	Z	N	TT	HO	OO	S	O	1	G	Maxi	¾	1"	1½"
Proportion	Prototype	900	450	440	220	160	128	87.1	76.2	64	48	36	32	22.5	16	12	9
  (1:X)
===========================================================================================================================================================
Length		3,382' 4¼'	3.758'	7.516'	7.687'	15.374'	21.140'	26.425'	38.833'
  [nominal]			[3¾']	[7½']	[7⅝']	[15⅜']	[21⅛']	[26⅜']	[38⅞']
Depth		1,181' 9¾"	1.313'	2.626'	2.686'	5.372'	7.386'	9.233"	13.568'
  [nominal]			[1¼']	[2⅝']	[2⅝']	[5⅜']	[7⅜']	[9⅜']	[13½']
===========================================================================================================================================================
SCALE		Prototype	TY	T	½Z	Z	N	TT	HO	OO	S	O	1	Maxi	G	¾	1"	1½"
Proportion	 		900	450	440	220	160	128	87.1	76	64	48	36	32	22.5	16	12	9
  (1:X)

Note:  HO scale of 1:87.1 used for calculations; actual HO scale is 1:87.08571428571------.
So, where does this leave us?  Clearly, the Marion River Carry Railroad is most definitely a "Vest Pocket Railroad You Can Model"!

Next, we will consider how to do just that.

For starters, let's isolate the key features one might wish to include:   new (25 Mar 2016)

Marion River Carry Features
(montage from image courtesy of L. Miller - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed image, click on picture for larger image]

WNW (left) to ESE (right) -
  Lower Steamboat Dock
  Steamboat House & Ways
  Engine House
  Water Tank
  INN
  Trestle {bridge}
  Upper Steamboat Dock

In smaller scales, this could be one module with LOTSA trees as view blocks between scenes; in larger scales, each scene could be an individual module.

[In fairness, I should note that this is all armchair modeling for me - I have no desire to build this myself;
 I have never built nor bought a tree, nor have I any desire to do so now!]

Straightened out like this, it becomes abundantly clear that the MRCRR would make an outstanding SHELF LAYOUT!

Unless you are REALLY cramped for space, even a shelf layout should be able to include the "L"-shaped wharf at the Lower Steamboat Dock.

I see that the Log Road and its bridge are missing; the weren't yet on the map back then.  They could easily be added just west (left) of the Upper Carry Dock.  I can't find the photo but it seems to me that the bridge was a simple longitudinal log affair covered with dirt.  It's easy to add:

Marion River Carry Features 2
(modified montage from image courtesy of L. Miller - all rights reserved)
[Thumbnailed image, click on picture for larger image]

tobecont


LEGACY

  What happens to all this when I DIE or (heaven forfend!) lose interest?  See LEGACY.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

See Copyright Notice on primary home page.



If you like model railroading nonsense (and good tips), take a gander at Jim Wells' incredible
.


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