S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com Road Load Page 5 keywords = road load heavy haul lift schnable schnabel rail freight car train car drop center well flat Pennsylvania Pennsy PRR Berlinerwerke model Combustion Engineering Krupp ABB GE TransAlta Westinghouse

Updated:  02 Jul 2011, 18:00  ET
[Page created:  21 Feb 2007; converted 02 Jul 2011;

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/roadld-5.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/roadld-5.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I had to scramble to transfer everything by then.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

Road Load Page 5


ROAD LOADS

(continued)

Gigantic highway and off-road trucks and trailers

HEAVY HAULAGE
and we mean HEAVY, here!

[similar to railroad Schnabel
and other GIANT railroad freight cars]

[IMAGE-INTENSIVE PAGE -
BIG LOADS - BIG PICTURES!]

This site has now been visited times since the counter was installed.

NOTE:  Page size is limited by HTML to some 30kB; thus, I am forced to add this page
in addition to the main Road Load page, et seq.

NOTE:  I regret that some of my internal links refuse to work; if they don't, please click "Back" and scroll.


INDEX

On the main Road Load page:

Road/Highway Schnabels - material moved from main RR Schnabel Car page,
MOVING LOCO #833 - moved to Road Loads page 4 (on sbiii.com) 16 Mar 2005
MOVING COKE DRUMS in ALBERTA

On the Road Load page 2:

MOVING THE GLENWOOD TANKS,
Road Load Models (moved to this page 01 Mar 05),
Mammoet Mammoth Road Loads, plus
just scroll away.

On the Road Load page 3:

Curved Girders.
Danly Press {to follow}.
Miller Transfer Rig.
Moving Big Muskie's Bucket.
Road Load Models (moved from cont. page 2 on 01 Mar 05).
Road Load Miscellany.
Bay Crane.

On the Road Load page 4 (on sbiii.com):

Moving Big Boy (Loco) #4023.

On this Road Load Page 5:

CRNL Coker to Ft. McMurray
BIG Ooops! (American Transport in Wyoming).
Columbia Gorge
Alberta SAGD Steam Generator

On the Road Load page 6:

Even More Road Load Miscellany.
Flip-overs   new.gif (25 Mar 2014)

On the main RR Schnabel Car page:

Scroll away, plus these specifics -
Schnabel Diagram.
Schnabel Car Loading Technique.
Schnabel References.
Road/Highway Schnabels - moved to this page 16 Mar 00.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 0:

36-wheel 880-Ton Schnabel Car(s).
Mammoet/ETARCO Mammoth Rail Loads.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 2:

    Scroll away, plus these specifics -
Model Schnabel and other Giant Cars.
Schnabel Miscellany.

Something has to lift these giant loads; see Big Cranes.


Jump to SB,III's RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of RR links

  and to SB,III's MODEL RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of model RR links (yea, verily, forsooth!).


Highway and Off-Road Variants of
SCHNABEL and other
giant RAILROAD CARS

(continued)

If this subject interests you, you must also see Tom Daspit's site, linked on page 1!

* - Spelling of the Name:  SCHNABEL vs. SCHNABLE - "Schnabel" is the KORREKT spelling!  It is the German word for "beak", which I originally thought referred to the beak-shaped loading arms, but now know was the name of the German inventor of the design ca. 1930 or so.  I don't know where or when I started using "Schnable", but it was wrong and I don't mind admitting my error.

If I ever find my original CE and Krupp materials (referred to below) and they show "SCHNABLE" (however unlikely), I'll have to correct this back again!


ABB Schnabel Car
ABB Image from R.I.C.A. (see below)

ABB Power Generation, Inc., Schnabel Car with what appears to be a Reactor or Boiler Load.

Then here is the Krupp-built 36-wheel CEBX 800 toting a 35.080m (111' 93/4") reactor vessel on 05 Jan 1991 in Saskatoon, Sasketchewan (Canada); it is a composite panorama made up of six (6) or seven (7) photos:

CEBX 800 Saskatoon 05Jan91
(1991 photos courtesy of Jim Banner - all rights reserved)

These railcars are shown here as teasers; see RR Schnabel Cars, et seq., for more on these rail equivalents of giant road vehicles.


Road/Highway Schnabels

(continued)


CRNL Coker to Ft. McMurray

Jim Patterson was kind enough to send me these images of the road move of a giant coker fractionator drum from the manufacturer, CESSCO, in Edmonton, Alberta, to CNRL (Canadian Natural Resources Limited) in Ft. McMurray, Alberta.  CNRL extracts oil from bitumen (a tar-like substance) found in the Northern Alberta oil sands, which contain over 300 billion barrels.  This unit is 190 feet (58m) long and weighs 1,091,000 lbs (495Kg) and is carried on highly specialized trailers with approximately 700 wheels.  It takes five days to haul it 600 miles.  In order to cross the North Saskatchewan River, it must travel east on Highway 14, then north to the Duvernay Bridge, then back west on Highway 28 to Highway 63, through Boyle and Grassland, and north to Ft. McMurray.  Ca. 19 Feb 2007, it rested in Wandering River before getting to its final destination ca. 20 Feb.  Highway signs, overhead power lines, street lights, etc. all have to be disconnected while this unit passes through.  The move is being made by Mammoet Transport.  {I'd guess the drum is some 30' (~9m) in diameter - SB,III}

[Comments by or via J. Patterson.]

It was fascinating seeing it cross over the bridge with two trucks pulling and one pushing.  The engineering must be very intricate handling it going down hills as well as pulling up the hills!!  You will notice that there were two more trucks on the other side of the bridge to hook up and pull it over the bridge and up the hill on the other side.  They hook together with ropes.  It is very important not to have too much extra weight on the bridge.

The observer(s) wanted to see the unit turn off Highway 55/63 onto the Ft. McMurray highway.  It is a 90 degree turn......as you can see in the pictures, it was a piece of cake.  The coker pivoted on top of the two trailers, the pilots on each of the trailers had control of the 700 wheels to turn the corner with ease; there are two pullers and two pushers.  It took about five minutes.

It only travels in the daylight.  Police reroute the traffic ahead and behind the unit as it travels so slowly and you cannot pass it going either direction.

There wouldn't be any room to pass anyway.

The clear span between trailer supports on the coker fractionator was about 65' (20m).

To transport the drum over the over the bridge required a transportation frame, with tare weight of about 75 tons, to which has to be added the weight of the reactors on a short span, plus the trucks and trailers; the bridge in the picture is over the North Saskatchewan at about Duvernay or Two Hills, Alberta.

McMurrayCoker116-1 McMurrayCoker116-3 McMurrayCoker116-4 McMurrayCoker116-5
(Ft. McMurray coker photos courtesy J. Patterson - all rights reserved)
{Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images.}
Picture 116-1 (l.) - CNRL Horizon Project Coker fractionator preparing to cross North Saskatchewan River at the Duvernay Bridge, AB
Picture 116-3 (l.c.) - Two tractors pulling front SPMT's plus one tractor pushing rear SPMT.  Two additional tractors pulling from north side of the bridge using ropes. Weight restriction of bridge limits equipment allowed on the bridge at one time.
Picture 116-4 (r.c.) - Same as Picture 3. Picture 116-5 (r.) - Disconnecting long pull rope and re-configuring tractors.  Note road sign moved out of way.

McMurrayCoker116-6 McMurrayCoker116-8 McMurrayCoker116-9 McMurrayCoker116-10
(Ft. McMurray coker photos courtesy J. Patterson - all rights reserved)
{Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images.}
Picture 116-6 (l.) - same as 005.
Picture 116-8 (l.c.) - same as 005.
Picture 116-9 (r.c.) - Four tractors plus SPMT's pulling coker up riverbank of North Saskatchewan River at Duvernay, AB.  One push tractor at rear SPMT.
Picture 116-10 (r.) - Two SPMT's c/w Dble 12 line - 4 file; 192 wheels per SPMT x 2 = 384 wheels plus tractors ~ 500 total.

McMurrayCoker116-11 McMurrayCoker116-12 McMurrayCoker117-1 McMurrayCoker117-3
(Ft. McMurray coker photos courtesy J. Patterson - all rights reserved)
{Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images.}
Picture 116-11 (l.) - same as 010.
Picture 116-12 (l.c.) - same as 010.
Picture 117-1 (r.c.) - Two lead tractors and two push tractors preparing for 90 degree turn off Highway #55 onto the Ft. McMurray highway #63.
Picture 117-3 (r.) - Starting the 90 degree turn off Highway #55 onto the Ft. McMurray highway #63.

McMurrayCoker117-4 McMurrayCoker117-5 McMurrayCoker117-6 McMurrayCoker117-7
(Ft. McMurray coker photos courtesy J. Patterson - all rights reserved)
{Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images.}
Picture 117-4 (l.) - Note front SPMT wheels turning to make 90 degree corner.
Picture 117-5 (l.c.) - Coker pivoting on SPMT saddles.
Picture 117-6 (r.c.) - same as 005.
Picture 117-7 (r.) - same as 005.

McMurrayCoker117-8 McMurrayCoker117-9 McMurrayCoker117-10
(all Ft. McMurray coker photos courtesy J. Patterson - all rights reserved)
{Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images.}
Picture 117-8 (l.) - Rear SPMT negotiating 90 degree corner.  Note load stabilizing arms connected to flanges.
Picture 117-9 (c.) - One push tractor direct connected to rear SPMT.
Picture 117-10 (r.) - Last push tractor negotiates 90 degree corner onto Hwy 63 to Ft. McMurray.

{more pictures to follow - hopefully}


BIG Ooops! - somewhere between Rawlins and Lander, Wyoming, on 07 Jun 2007, ca. 19:00 local time, an American Transport rig was led astray on a side road and tried to back into a tiny rest area to turn around.  No way, Hose A!  Recorded by my sister with her cell phone camera on 07 and 08 Jun 2007:

(All 25 pictures, 49-73, and captions by P. B. Ottens, 07/08 Jun 2007 - all rights reserved)

{07Jun07AmerTran49}
49 - He started to back it in 2007-06-07

{07Jun07AmerTran50}
50 - Getting around

{07Jun07AmerTran51}
51 - The rear end

{07Jun07AmerTran52}
52 - He backed it in some more

{07Jun07AmerTran53}
53 - This is where he lost it

{07Jun07AmerTran54}
54 - A definite oops

{07Jun07AmerTran55}
55 - Those who wait

{07Jun07AmerTran56}
56 - Hmmmm!  2007-06-07

{07Jun07AmerTran57}
57 - View from our place 2007-06-07

{07Jun07AmerTran58}
58 - Took way too much room

{07Jun07AmerTran59}
59 - This is the problem

{07Jun07AmerTran60}
60 - Lets try again

{07Jun07AmerTran61}
61 - Trying to recouple

{07Jun07AmerTran62}
62 - What do we do now 2007-06-07

{07Jun07AmerTran63}
63 - A true Pennsylvania maneuver

{07Jun07AmerTran64}
64 - The culprit - First she she took the wrong turn - Then she tried removing road signs. 2007-06-08

{07Jun07AmerTran65}
65 - One good turn - He got fed up waiting and made this turn correctly 2007-06-07

{07Jun07AmerTran66}
66 - The solution

{07Jun07AmerTran67}
67 - Starry Night - 2007-06-07

{07Jun07AmerTran68}
68 - Still working

{07Jun07AmerTran69}
69 - And eventually

{The following four pix appear to have been taken the next morning, 08 Jun 2007}

{08Jun07AmerTran70}
70 - Inspect the front

{08Jun07AmerTran71}
71 - Uh oh {How NOT to impress OSHA (let alone the shipper)! - SB,III}

{08Jun07AmerTran72}
72 - Inspecting the back

{08Jun07AmerTran73}
73 - On the road again, Friday - The next morning 2007-06-08
(All 25 pictures, 49-73, and captions by P. B. Ottens, 07/08 Jun 2007 - all rights reserved)

A standard 18-wheeler also went astray there but had no (or little) trouble executing the same maneuver {picture 65, above}.

My sister's narrative {edited}:

"About 7 p.m., the wide-load pickup leading a multi-axle tractor-trailer truck carrying a 200,000 pound load missed it's turn about 1/2 a mile down the road from where we stopped for the night {to be determined}.  The driver of the truck tried to turn around in a small rest area just across the road from us.  He couldn't make it.  He dropped the tank he was hauling {not quite} right across the road, blocking traffic in both lanes.  Eventually, cars could get around him but no trucks could.  The backlog of trucks in both directions was not of epic proportions as it would have been in Pennsylvania, but there were probably about 15 disgruntled truckers.  We had about 4 hours of entertainment until the winch truck that arrived at 10 p.m. got the truck and it's load back together and onto the highway.  Th{e next} morning, the trucker came back and drove his load away."

How embarassing!


The Columbia River Gorge, separating Washington from Oregon between Portland and Pasco/Pendleton, is one of the scenic wonders of the world.  On a 9,617 mile road trip from New York to Portland and back (via many National Parks) in Jun/Jul 2007, I traversed the Gorge both ways and saw many big multi-axle rigs.  Many were running light (telescoped) both east and west on Interstates 70, 80, and 87.  Two sets in particular were of great interest to me and the first seemed to explain what the rig my sister saw (above) and possibly the second I saw were all about.

The first set (four units) was parked on the north side of W/B Route 14 on the Washington (north) side of the Gorge near Roosevelt, Washington, east of The Dalles (mid-point); I was whizzing along (speed limits out there are rather high) toward Portland on 18 Jun 2007 and screeched to an abrupt halt, turned into an unpaved parking area, and took these three shots:

turbine205 turbine206 turbine207
[Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images]
(All photos 18 Jun 2007 by and © 2007 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

Those are the three propellor blades and the column (or part of one) for a huge wind turbine; the column may well be like the cylinder my sister saw ditched.  Unfortunately, I did not record whose tractors those were and can't read the door panel info.

On the way back east, on Interstate 84 E/B near Boardman, Oregon, just about where the highway drops away from the river, on 25 Jun 2007, I spotted a huge blue disc barreling along far ahead of me; it took a while to overtake it and I snapped a grab shot through the windshield as I went by:

cyl-313
[Thumbnail image - click on picture for larger image]
(25 Jun 2007 photo by and © 2007 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

Then, coming out of a convenient rest area, there it was parked alongside the entry ramp back onto 84, with a Mullen tractor up front:

cyl-314 cyl-315 cyl-316
[Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images]
(All photos 25 Jun 2007 by and © 2007 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

cyl-317 cyl-318
[Thumbnail images - click on pictures for larger images]
(All photos 25 Jun 2007 by and © 2007 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

cyl-319(w/III)
[Thumbnail image - click on picture for larger image]
(25 Jun 2007 photo by and © 2007 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

That's me grinning at you (everybody's gotta get into the act!).


Some of Weeks Marine's heavier lifts include those made by their 750-ton floating crane #533 hoisting heavy pressure vessels for Phillips-Tosco's Bayway (NJ) refinery:

Weeks-20
[Photo courtesy of Weeks Marine, Inc., by permission - all rights reserved]
(Click on thumbnailed image for larger picture]

Notice the giant yellow multi-axle road trailer under the silver vessel; here's an enlarged crop of it:

Weeks-20x
[Cropped enlargement of photo courtesy of Weeks Marine, Inc., by permission - all rights reserved]

Who can tell us more about that trailer (or is it trailers or a dolly or dollies)?


Now, here's a giant heat recovery steam generator being transported by Burnell Contractors to a SAGD site in northern Alberta (up around Christina Lake) ca. Sep 2007 - SAGD is Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage, an enhanced thermal oil recovery technology for heavy crude and bitumen in use at the Athabasca Oil Sands and elsewhere:

AlbertaSAGDgen1
[Cropped enlargement of photo courtesy of a friend - all rights reserved]
(Click on thumbnailed image for larger picture]

AlbertaSAGDgen2
[Cropped enlargement of photo courtesy of a friend - all rights reserved]
(Click on thumbnailed image for larger picture]

AlbertaSAGDgen3
[Cropped enlargement of photo courtesy of a friend - all rights reserved]
(Click on thumbnailed image for larger picture]

AlbertaSAGDgen4
[Cropped enlargement of photo courtesy of a friend - all rights reserved]
(Click on thumbnailed image for larger picture]

I cropped the photos heavily (except #2) to save storage and loading time, but no pertinent imagery was lost, only some scenery.  BIG, ain't it?  Look at that sea of tires, and on a dirt road, no less, however beautifully graded!



See page 1 for related links and references

Here are some of my own site links (12 May 00):

My own Tractors page, with its links.


U.S.Flag U.S.Flag

THUMBS UP!

THUMBS UP!  -  Support your local police, fire, and emergency personnel!


S. Berliner, III

To contact S. Berliner, III, please click here.



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