S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com McHugh Road Load Continuation Page 1 keywords = McHugh Mc Hugh road load heavy haul haulage lift Trabosa Cline schnabel

Updated:   02 Jul 2011, 18.45  ET
[Page created: 21 Feb 2007; converted: 02 Jul 2011

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/roadmch1.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/roadmch1.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I had to scramble to transfer everything by then.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

McHugh Road Load Continuation Page 1


McHUGH ROAD LOADS

(continued)

Gigantic highway and off-road trucks and trailers

HEAVY HAULAGE
and we mean HEAVY, here!

[similar to railroad Schnabel
and other GIANT railroad freight cars]

imgintpg.gif

[BIG LOADS - BIG PICTURES!]

NOTE:  I regret that some of my internal links refuse to work; if they don't, please click "Back" and scroll.

McHughUSS McHughNeat
(Details below - images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
McHugh Then and Now


note-rt.gif  All images on this page, unless otherwise noted, are © McHugh and may not be copied or used in any way without the prior, written consent of the McHugh family.


INDEX

On the main McHugh Road Load page:   new.gif (30 Aug 08)
  History of the McHugh Firm.
  USS Fairless Vessels.
  Philadelphia Red Arrow Cars.
  McHugh #243 Tractor.
  McHugh Technical Background.
  McHugh Bros. Equipment List.
  Excerpted McHugh Bros. Equipment Diagrams.

On this McHugh Road Load Continuation Page 1:
  1980 McHugh Bros. Brochure.
  Moving the Franklin Institute's 707.
    and just scroll on down for even more!

On the main Road Load page:
  Road/Highway Schnabels - material moved from main RR Schnabel Car page,
  MOVING LOCO #833 - moved to Road Loads page 4 (on sbiii.com) 16 Mar 2005
  MOVING COKE DRUMS in ALBERTA

On the Road Load page 2:
  MOVING THE GLENWOOD TANKS,
  Road Load Models (moved to this page 01 Mar 05),
  Mammoet Mammoth Road Loads, plus
  just scroll away.

On the Road Load page 3:
  Curved Girders.
  Danly Press {to follow}.
  Miller Transfer Rig.
  Moving Big Muskie's Bucket.
  Road Load Models (moved from cont. page 2 on 01 Mar 05).
  Road Load Miscellany.
  Bay Crane.

On the Road Load page 4 (on sbiii.com):
  Moving Big Boy (Loco) #4023.

On the Road Load page 5:
  CRNL Coker to Ft. McMurray
  BIG Ooops! (American Transport in Wyoming).
  Columbia Gorge
  Alberta SAGD Steam Generator

On the main RR Schnabel Car page:
    Scroll away, plus these specifics -
  Schnabel Diagram.
  Schnabel Car Loading Technique.
  Schnabel References.
  Road/Highway Schnabels - moved to this page 16 Mar 00.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 0:
  36-wheel 880-Ton Schnabel Car(s).
  Mammoet/ETARCO Mammoth Rail Loads.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 2:
    Scroll away, plus these specifics -
  Model Schnabel and other Giant Cars.
  Schnabel Miscellany.

Something has to lift these giant loads; see Big Cranes.


Jump to SB,III's RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of RR links

  and to SB,III's MODEL RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of model RR links (yea, verily, forsooth!).


McHUGH HEAVY HAULAGE

Highway and Off-Road Variants of
SCHNABEL and other
giant RAILROAD CARS


If this subject interests you, you must also see SB,III's Road Load page, et seq.,
and Tom Daspit's site (and others), linked thereon!


McHugh Heavy Haulage and Road/Highway Loads (continued)

McHUGH RAILROAD MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT, INC. specializes in Locomotive Cranes and Locomotives, selling and maintaining them worldwide, including stocking parts and providing service.

"Locomotive Crane Parts & Repairs, Locomotive Parts & Repairs, Industrial Plant Locomotives, Locomotive Traction Motors, Locomotive Crane Traction Motors, Barko Hydraulic Locomotive Material Handlers, Hydraulic Knuckle Boom Locomotive Material Handlers, Locomotive Crane Generators, Locomotive Generators, Locomotive Mounted Material Handlers." (among other things!).

See the main McHugh Page for more background on this firm and its products and services.

Mack#4-5a
(Photo courtesy of, and © J. C. McHugh - cropped and enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

1980 McHugh Brothers Color Brochure

J. C. had a color brochure around from 1980 and scanned it and sent it to me.  He wrote, "It really shows some neat moves.  - - - a fellow made me a model of our old #243 heavy haul truck from them."  The model was in HO (1:87.1).  Well, I found that brochure of such great interest that I have reproduced it in full and excerpted all the illustrations separately as well.

Repeating from the main McHugh page, In the early '50s, E. P. McHugh had the world's largest truck-mounted crane; it was a 45-tonner.  Those 3 big trucks were:

a 1960 Hendrickson #53, withy a 671 engine, 5-speed aux. tranny, 7-speed tranny, 65,000# rear axles, heavy-duty walking beams, and the back end (truck tire to tire) was 9' 3" wide.

a 1970 Cline 3-axle dump truck, converted into a 3-axle heavy haul tractor, redesigned by Jimmy McHugh, and

a 1970 Cline 3-axle dump truck, converted into a 4-axle heavy haul tractor, redesigned by Jimmy McHugh; the units two-axle steering system was removed from an old '50 American truck crane from which the upper works had been made into a crawler crane.

The trailer was a Trabosa, made in Spain; two were made at the same time, one for McHugh and one for Aycock.

First, let's see the whole brochure (rear and front covers - left / inner pages - right):

note-rt.gif  These images, and those that follow, are thumbnailed and BIG; before you click on them, you might rather scroll down to the specific exerpted details in which you are interested.

[This brochure is NOT current.]

McHughBrochure6&9 McHughBrochure7&8
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

The front and rear covers:

McHughBroch6 McHughBroch9
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

CO{V}ER: Three Crane Pick 328 {ton} Westinghouse Stator. {left, upper}
168 ton Open Hearth Pan S{?}or on 12 axle Trabosa Trailer at Fairl{es}s Works {left, lower}

[This brochure is NOT current.]

The inner left (second) and inner right (third) pages:

"SOMETHING'S DOING AND MC HUGH'S DOING IT"

CO{V}ER:
Three Crane Pick 328 {ton} Westinghouse Stator.
168 ton Open Hearth Pan S{?}or on 12 axle Trabosa Trailer
at Fairl{es}s Works

McHughBroch7 McHughBroch8
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

Many of these excerpted images are of, or include, heavy cranes,
for more of such, see my Big Cranes page, et seq.

From the front cover:

MCHUGH BROTHERS

CRANE RENTALS

HEAVY HAULING

McHughBroch6a McHughBroch6b
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

[Three Crane Pick 328 {ton} Westinghouse Stator. {left}
168 ton Open Hearth Pan S{?}or on 12 axle Trabosa Trailer at Fairl{es}s Works
{right}

From the inner left (second) page:

McHughBroch7a McHughBroch7b
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
Front half of 273 ton vessel, 160 ft. long.  ||  180' long, 136 ton, 19' diameter swivel dolly
BP Oil, Marcus Hook, PA.  ||  and standard low bed with swivel.  Baltimore, MD.

McHughBroch7c McHughBroch7f
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
Rear view of 379 ton load.  ||  One of ten 160 ton generators transported.
BP Oil, Marcus Hook, PA.  ||  Croyden, PA.

McHughBroch7d McHughBroch7e
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
231 ton on 9 axle Trabosa trailer.  ||  Bird'-eye view of 379 ton, 86' long vessel.
Eddystone, PA.  ||  BP Oil, Marcus Hook, PA.

THAT LAST {right} SHOT IS ESPECIALLY INTERESTING FOR HEAVY LOAD AFFICIONADOS;
IT CLEARLY SHOWS HOW MULTI-AXLE LOAD CARRIERS STEER.

From the inner right (third) page:

McHughBroch8a McHughBroch8b
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
175 ton ladle on 250 ton Low Bed.  ||  Preparing to load 328 ton Stator for export.
Loaded and hauled at Fairless Works.  ||  Philadelphia Piers.

McHughBroch8c McHughBroch8d McHughBroch8e
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
165 ton McHugh Crawler ready to go.  ||  328 ton Stator on the move.  ||  4100 Manitowoc on the move.

From the rear cover:

McHughBroch9a McHughBroch9d
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
Front Half of 273 ton vessel, 160' Long.  ||  Erecting 180' Tower.
BP Oil, Marcus Hook, PA.  ||  Baulder, MD.
-      ||  With 200 ton McHugh
-      ||  Truck Crane taking half.

McHughBroch9c
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}
Erie boiler for Gulf Oil.  110 ton, Barge to Foundation.

McHughBroch9b McHughBroch9e
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}
Setting Prestress Beams on I-95.  ||  Two 140 ton Americans
Philadelphia, PA.  ||  taking down and relocating
-      ||  150,000 lb. Water Tower.
-      ||  Harrisburg International Airport, PA.

[This brochure is NOT current.]


Moving the Franklin Institute's 707.

J. C. scanned four photos of McHugh Bros. moving the Franklin Institute's Boeing 707 from the Philadelphia airport and through downtown to it's final resting place.  The job was done in 1976.

Photo #1 shows one platform of the trabosa trailer with a specially-built swivel bolster that will be placed under the back of the plane:

McHugh707-1
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

Photo #2 is a great side shot, taken just before leaving the airport property:

McHugh707-2
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

Look closely at photos #1 and #2; there's a change!  The forward fuselage is lettered:

THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE 707

to which some wag (a McHugh?) has quite-neatly added:

STILL NEEDS $ SEND SOME

Photo #3 shows J. C.'s uncle Bob raising the gooseneck to get it over the street curb.  J. C.'s dad, Jimmy, is the fellow to the right in the photo.

McHugh707-3
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

J. C. was there standing next to his dad, who gave the photographer hell for not getting J. C. in the shot.  He told dad he did not think a young boy should be in the photo.

Photo #4 has a 220-ton American 6-axle crane taking the nose end of the plane and two 4-axle 150-ton American cranes lifting at the wing sections:

McHugh707-4
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

#290 was one of eight Hendrickson tractors; they were heavy haulers.  Seven were heavy-duty, specially-built road tractors; their #53 was a big brute.

At that time, six of the "little" Hendricksons were sold off, except for #290 & #53 for special jobs because of their extremely-low-speed gearing; in 1973 the company replaced the seven others with new heavy-duty Autocar tractors with 55,000# rears.

Actually, there were seven little Hendrickson tractors, #'s 110, 128, 129, 137, 143, 157, and 290, and one big Hendrickson tractor #53.


Speaking of "little" Hendrickson #53, she was the power for a move of a Norristown High Speed Railline trolley car to RTM:

McHugh53Norristown
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

The trailer is a 60-ton-capacity Talbert with a McHugh-built 45' deck section installed between the Talbert gooseneck and Talbert 16-tire tandem-axle rear bridge assembly; the deck section was designed by Jimmy McHugh and built in the McHugh shops. The railcar move was another job where Jimmy donated the use of equipment and labor.

McHugh Bros. also was heavily involved in the erection of New York City's Verazzano-Narrows Bridge by American Bridge Co.  Here are two McHugh cranes, a 50-ton and a 45-ton, being lifted off a McHugh barge onto the unfinished deck of the Narrows bridge in February 1964:

McHughNarrows1
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

One of the two McHugh cranes working on the deck of the Narrows bridge for American Bridge Co. in May 1964:

McHughNarrows2
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

J. C. says you can see the other crane's boom on the deck of the other pier (upright tower); it will take a LOT higher res. for me to see that!

Jimmy McHugh told the story of one crane on which a boom hoist clutch had to be changed out during the job, in May 1964.  Four mechanics refused to go out on the bridge to repair the crane.  Jimmy and Bob McHugh had to do the work on the machine, themselves (they both were local 825 Operating Engineers members).  After this project, when Jimmy visited other bridge projects throughout the USA where McHugh cranes were used and he arrived on the job, the supervisors would say, "Here is our honorary hot rivet man".

Label notwithstanding, the barge was owned by American Bridge Company.  McHugh did a very good part of ABC's erecting work with their cranes and did most of their hauling.  American Bridge's big fabricating shops were located in Trenton, New Jersey; only about nine miles away from McHugh across the river.  Also, they had one of their three nationwide warehouse/storage yards located on the same property and all of the hauling in and out was also done by McHugh.

The two truck cranes were placed on short sections of deck at each tower; then, each crane worked it's way toward the center and outwards near land.  The photo is the best J. C. could do; it is really yellowed out.

Jimmy advised J. C. that, if you notice in the photo, the truck cranes' tires have been removed.  On the newly laid concrete deck, first there was 2" x 12" oak wood planking laid to keep the concrete from being damaged.  Then, the long beams were placed over the wood planking to spread the load and the drums of the wheels were placed onto them.  The outrigger pads also had wood planking under them.

Jimmy tells J. C. that the crane was used to place the cross section deck braces and other items.  Then concrete was made on site (right on the deck) and then put into a concrete bucket and then moved to where it was required by the crane; remember that there were no big concrete pump trucks with telescoping booms in those old days.

J. C. found this shot of a GE 50-ton locomotive they delivered in March 2008.  The tractor is a 1983 Freightliner with an 871 Detroit Diesel, and was built as a coal dump truck and used in central Pennsylvania coal fields; it has a triple frame the full length of the truck. At that time, it was hard to find 4-axle tractors that were necessary to meet the new highway axle weight laws, so they purchased the unit in 1985 and made it into a tractor.  It's still a nice truck and J. C. hauled the Mack #4 locomotive to the Brownsville, Pennsylvania, equipment show with it (the truck is #26):

McHughHaul50tGE
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

Here is an American 5030DE locomotive crane with 50-ton lift capacity that McHugh delivered to Norfolk Southern in September 2007:

McHughHaul50tGE
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

In June 2008, McHugh hauled an 80,000lb railroad safety car for ArcelorMittal Steel, using #46 Autocar and that 60-ton Talbert trailer with the McHugh 45' deck section:

McHughHaulSafetyFlat2 McHughHaulSafetyFlat3
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

No cranes were required; the gooseneck was removed and the tractor is equipped with a winch that will be connected to the other end of the railcar, providing safe traveling of the unit off the trailer and onto the railroad track.

Here's a photo of a McHugh-rebuilt American 75-ton lift capacity locomotive crane being assembled by a McHugh 55-ton AH&D truck crane for Norfolk Southern and a second photo in which they are ready to install the boom:

McHughAm75t55 McHughAm75t8
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

November 2006 - McHugh #26 tractor and trailer at BNSF railyard in Lincoln, Nebraska, with 5030 locomotive crane truck assemblies and boom:

McHugh066 McHugh068
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

The BNSF crane upper and carbody are loaded onto a flat car for shipment to the McHugh plant and then the crane will be rebuilt.


As J. C. finds more old pictures, I'll post them; this may means an occasional discontinuity in chronology but you can use the index above or scroll around to find the associated other pictures and text.



See the main McHugh Page for more background on this firm and its products and services.

See Road Load page 1 for related links and references

Here are some of my own site links (12 May 00):

  My own Road Loads page, et seq.,
  My own Tractors page, and
  My own Big Cranes page, et seq.


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S. Berliner, III

To contact S. Berliner, III, please click here.



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