S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com McHugh Road Load Page keywords = McHugh Mc Hugh road load heavy haul haulage lift Trabosa Cline schnabel

Updated:   02 Jul 2011, 18.20  ET
[Page created: 21 Feb 2007; converted: 02 Jul 2011

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/roadmchu.html
[was at "home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/roadmchu.html"]

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I had to scramble to transfer everything by then.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

McHugh Road Load Page


McHUGH ROAD LOADS

Gigantic highway and off-road trucks and trailers

HEAVY HAULAGE
and we mean HEAVY, here!

[similar to railroad Schnabel
and other GIANT railroad freight cars]

imgintpg.gif

[BIG LOADS - BIG PICTURES!]

NOTE:  I regret that some of my internal links refuse to work; if they don't, please click "Back" and scroll.

McHughUSS McHughNeat
(Details below - images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
McHugh Then and Now


note-rt.gif  All images on this page, unless otherwise noted, are © McHugh and may not be copied or used in any way without the prior, written consent of the McHugh family.


INDEX

On this McHugh Road Load page:
  History of the McHugh Firm.
  USS Fairless Vessels.
  Philadelphia Red Arrow Cars.
  McHugh #243 Tractor.
  McHugh Technical Background.
  McHugh Bros. Equipment List.
  Excerpted McHugh Bros. Equipment Diagrams.

On the McHugh Road Load Continuation Page 1:
  1980 McHugh Bros. Brochure.
  Moving the Franklin Institute's 707.
    and just scroll on down for much more!

On the main Road Load page:
  Road/Highway Schnabels - material moved from main RR Schnabel Car page,
  MOVING LOCO #833 - moved to Road Loads page 4 (on sbiii.com) 16 Mar 2005
  MOVING COKE DRUMS in ALBERTA

On the Road Load page 2:
  MOVING THE GLENWOOD TANKS,
  Road Load Models (moved to this page 01 Mar 05),
  Mammoet Mammoth Road Loads, plus just scroll away.

On the Road Load page 3:
  Curved Girders.
  Danly Press {to follow}.
  Miller Transfer Rig.
  Moving Big Muskie's Bucket.
  Road Load Models (moved from cont. page 2 on 01 Mar 05).
  Road Load Miscellany.
  Bay Crane.

On the Road Load page 4 (on sbiii.com):
  Moving Big Boy (Loco) #4023.

On the Road Load page 5:
  CRNL Coker to Ft. McMurray
  BIG Ooops! (American Transport in Wyoming).
  Columbia Gorge.
  Alberta SAGD Steam Generator.

On the main RR Schnabel Car page:
    Scroll away, plus these specifics -
  Schnabel Diagram.
  Schnabel Car Loading Technique.
  Schnabel References.
  Road/Highway Schnabels - moved to this page 16 Mar 00.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 0:
  36-wheel 880-Ton Schnabel Car(s).
  Mammoet/ETARCO Mammoth Rail Loads.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 2:
    Scroll away, plus these specifics -
  Model Schnabel and other Giant Cars.
  Schnabel Miscellany.

Something has to lift these giant loads; see Big Cranes.


Jump to SB,III's RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of RR links

  and to SB,III's MODEL RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of model RR links (yea, verily, forsooth!).


McHUGH HEAVY HAULAGE

Highway and Off-Road Variants of
SCHNABEL and other
giant RAILROAD CARS


If this subject interests you, you must also see SB,III's Road Load page, et seq., and Tom Daspit's site (and others), linked thereon!


ABB Schnabel Car
ABB Image from R.I.C.A. (see below)

ABB Power Generation, Inc., Schnabel Car with what appears to be a Reactor or Boiler Load.

Then here is the Krupp-built 36-wheel CEBX 800 toting a 35.080m (111' 93/4") reactor vessel on 05 Jan 1991 in Saskatoon, Sasketchewan (Canada); it is a composite panorama made up of six (6) or seven (7) photos:

CEBX 800 Saskatoon 05Jan91
(1991 photos courtesy of Jim Banner - all rights reserved)

These railcars are shown here as teasers; see RR Schnabel Cars, et seq., for more on these rail equivalents of giant road vehicles.


McHugh Heavy Haulage and Road/Highway Loads

McHUGH RAILROAD MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT, INC. specializes in Locomotive Cranes and Locomotives, selling and maintaining them worldwide, including stocking parts and providing service.

"Locomotive Crane Parts & Repairs, Locomotive Parts & Repairs, Industrial Plant Locomotives, Locomotive Traction Motors, Locomotive Crane Traction Motors, Barko Hydraulic Locomotive Material Handlers, Hydraulic Knuckle Boom Locomotive Material Handlers, Locomotive Crane Generators, Locomotive Generators, Locomotive Mounted Material Handlers." (among other things!).

A multi-generation family enterprise, McHugh came to my attention when J. C. McHugh sent me photos of a boxcab diesel locomotive they have lovingly restored to operating condition and show at meets; a 1924 General Electric trolley box motor rebuilt by Mack into diesel-electric #4 in 1939.  The Mack is covered on its own Survivor Boxcab page and one of the pictures shows it on a McHugh Bros. flatbed.  That's all it took for me to get interested in Mc Hugh far beyond railroading!

Mack#4-5a
(Photo courtesy of, and © J. C. McHugh - cropped and enhanced - all rights reserved)
[Click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture]

[March, 1970 - Mack #4 on a McHugh tractor trailer at the Rockhill Trolley Museum site in Rockhill Furnace, on the way to the New Hope & Ivyland short line railroad in eastern Pennsylvania.]

  [More on the RTM below.]

McHUGH RAILROAD MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT, INC.
Mailing Address:  P.O. Box 8, Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania  19030
Phone:  215-949-0430 / Fax:  215-949-0422
Plant Location:  225 Lincoln Highway, Bldg# 3 at Strick, Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania

E-mail:  info@mchughlocomotiveandcrane.com


McHugh History - Paraphrasing J. C. McHugh:

C(harles). J McHugh Co, started in 1896, with P.U.C. certificate #87 for the State of Pennsylvania Hauling Authority, until 1989, when J. C.'s dad's last two brothers left the business.  Hauling was done with with six teams of horses and eight special wagons, as well as with two steam tractors used for rigging.

C. J. McHugh & Son - 1916

E. P. McHugh - 1932 (plus several other operations until 1959).

McHugh Bros. - 1958 - equipment rentals (started by J. C., Sr. - "Jimmy") - rigging, crane rentals, heavy hauling, railroading.

There were a number of firms operating under the McHugh family ægis:

Any equipment that was in Pennsylvania (at Penndel) was Bucks County Construction Co.  J. C.'s grandfather passed in a boat accident in 1959 and that corporation was his.  His father's company (McHugh Bros.) was started in Miami, Florida, when Jimmy was at school.

Bucks County Construction Co. was incorporated in 1941 and went out of the construction business in 1959 (when E. P. McHugh passed on); BCCC had the I.C.C. rights for hauling and until 1981 you could see in small lettering "BCCC ICC#" and along with a "PUC #".  In 1981, that business was absored by McHugh Bros. Heavy Hauling.

Equipment was painted with Bucks County Construction Co. until 1969.  You can see the small McHugh Bros. in white on the front engine hoods.  It was also applied on the crane operators upper cab doors and on the other side as well.  As equipment was repainted back then, new lettering was applied, with the large "BCCC" removed from the cranes and the small ones from the trucks.

There were several McHugh Bros. companies:
    McHugh Bros. Heavy Hauling, Inc.
    McHugh Bros. Crane Rentals, Inc.
    McHugh Bros. Equipment Corp.

All started in the early 1960's and ran until 1985.  There were also many other subsidiary companies.

E. P. McHugh II specialized in hauling; it was in J. C.'s cousins' name (a non-union company for hauling nation-wide with owner operators, not "the big stuff".

Shore Fast Line Railroad - E. P. McHugh II, and J. C. McHugh were the family members partnered with a stone quarry on this operation.

J. C. had "threatened" me with some more neat photos, like moving a 707 jet from the Philadelphia airport into downtown Philadelphia to the Franklin Institute, moving a 610-ton reactor in 1973, plus every day moving of 200-ton American crawler cranes with the crawler tracks, counterweight, and base section of boom, on a 250-ton I-beam trailer, long bridge beams, vessels for refineries, etc. (some 400 foot long).  [Bring 'em on - THESE I hadda see! - see the index, above.]

Here's a very old color shot of McHugh Bros. moving a slew of 20' diameter by 16' high blast furnace segments from Ohio to United States Steel's Fairless works in (surprise!) Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania [Gee, where have we just seen that town?]:

McHughFairless
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)

While we're back in the past, here's a great shot of NINE-year-old J. C., replete with safety helmet, work boots, and work gloves, attaching the red flag to #61, a 1925 J. G. Brill Red Arrow center-door car from the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co. on its way from storage at the McHugh's old Penndel yard where it had lain ca. 1968/69 to its removal in November 1985, when it then went to a farm near Allentown, Pennsylvania:

JCMcHughRTM#61
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

As J. C. put it, "heavy hauling has been in my blood since an early age".

#61 has, for the last couple of years, been stored in a trolley car barn at the Rockhill Trolley Museum at Rockhill Furnace, Pennsylvania (near Orbisonia and the East Broad Top), pending future restoration.

[While I have little interest in traction, this story has ramifications like all get out!  #61 had always been RTM's and Jimmy McHugh (J. C. McHugh, Sr. - J. C.'s dad) stored it at no charge; they left the old family business in November 1985 and the rest of the family said all the RR equipment had to go.  Jimmy was an RTM member and always did this type of work at no charge.  There are FOUR such cars around, two of which are running!  Typical of suburban trolleys built around 1920, Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Company's Red Arrow Lines cars were large, heavy, double-ended cars; the PST concealed arched windows with tacked-on sheet metal after World War II, in an attempt to modernize the cars.  1926 #66 (running) and #73 (unrestored) are at the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum in Washington (near Pittsburgh).  #73 is important to the PTM because it will enable operation of two-car trains, just as Red Arrow did at times of heavy traffic.  1926 #76 is running at the Electric City Trolley Museum in Scranton, Pennsylvania; it was originally built for the PSTC’s predecessor company, the Philadelphia & West Chester Traction Co, the highest-numbered car of a 32-car fleet of such cars bought in three orders, starting in 1919.  These crowd-swallowing trolleys roamed the "Red Arrow Lines" system from the 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby to suburban terminals in West Chester, Ardmore, Media, and Sharon Hill.  As more modern cars arrived over the years, the remaining large, heavy Center Door cars were relegated to rush-hour "tripper" service, school trips, and winter operation to keep the lines clear of snow.  Car #76 was retired in 1976.]

{text per RTM and ECTM

One guess which hauling firm stored and moved these cars
to their respective museums (at no charge)?

When the old McHugh Bros. firm broke up in November 1985 and old #61 had to be moved precipitously, she was loaded out by the volunteers of the Rockhill Trolley Museum onto a tractor trailer at McHugh's Penndel, Pennsylvania, facility on the second weekend of November; here is a picture of that event, with J. C. McHugh standing next to the crane, a 165-ton American Crawler Crane operated by his dad, Jimmy McHugh:

JCMcHughRTM#61Nov85
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)

Unfortunately, other parties intervened and, while the Cornwell Railway freight motor had its truck assemblies removed and delivered to RTM, the body was set on fire and burnt to the ground.  Happily, the McHugh team is still able to help out the EBT, RTM, and WK&S with donations and has continued their close relationship with all three organizations; that's been a long-term commitment.

Here we have old photos of McHugh tractor #243 with a Trabosa trailer unloading a boiler vessel from a barge, using McHugh 200-ton and 220-ton truck cranes in 1972:

McHugh243-2 McHugh243-3
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh243-4 McHugh243-5
(Images © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

Jimmy (J. C., Sr. - a mechanical engineer) was involved in the design of the first 6-axle and first 3-axle drive, 6-axle crane carrier in 1960.  He had Hendrickson build them and they were the first carriers that were not made of a large casting and used the then new USS T-1 steel. At that time, it was the largest crane of 100-ton lift capacity using a American hoist upper works:

McHugh10
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

The label in the lower right reads:

SUMMER 1965
Hoisting "GEMINI"
space capsule
GENERAL ELECTRIC

In the early '50s, E. P. McHugh had the world's largest truck-mounted crane; it was a 45-tonner.  J. C. had a color brochure around and scanned it and sent it to me.  He wrote, "It really shows some neat moves.  - - - a fellow made me a model of our old #243 heavy haul truck from them." The model was in HO (1:87.1).  Well, I found that brochure of such great interest that I have reproduced it in full and excerpted all the illustrations separately as well; see the 1950s McHugh Bros. Brochure on McHugh Road Load Continuation Page 1.

The 3 big trucks were:

a 1960 Hendrickson #53, with a 671 engine, 7-speed tranny, 5-speed aux. tranny, 65,000# rear axles, heavy-duty walking beams, and a 9' 3" wide back end (truck tire to tire);

a 1970 Cline 3-axle dump truck, converted into a 3-axle heavy haul tractor, redesigned by Jimmy McHugh; and

a 1970 Cline 3-axle dump truck, converted into a 4-axle heavy haul tractor, redesigned by Jimmy McHugh; the units two-axle steering system was removed from an old '50 American truck crane (from which the upper works had been made into a crawler crane).

The trailer was a Trabosa, made in Spain; two were made at the same time, one for McHugh and one for Aycock:

McHugh5
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

[For photos of these trucks, and more, see the 1980 McHugh Brothers brochure
on McHugh Roadload Continuation page 1.]

J. C. found these old McHugh Bros. rigging, crane, and heavy hauling equipment lists [(please bear in mind that they are NOT current!)  Detail enlargements follow.]:

McHugh1
McHugh
(Image 1 - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

McHugh2 McHugh3
(Images 2 & 3 - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

[These first three are of such great interest, explaining how multi-axle trailers work, that I have excerpted the images separately below.]

McHugh4
(Image 4 - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

McHugh Equipment Diagrams (excerpted from images 1, 2 and 3, above)

(excerpted from Image 1):

McHugh1a McHugh1b McHugh1c
(Excerpted images 1a, 1b, & 1c - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh1d McHugh1e
(Excerpted images 1d & 1e - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

(excerpted from Image 2):

McHugh2a
(Excerpted image 2a - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

McHugh2b McHugh2c McHugh2d
(Excerpted images 2b, 2c, & 2d - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh2e McHugh2f
(Excerpted images 2e & 2f - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

BASIC PLATFORM TRAILERS (excerpted from Image 3):

McHugh3a McHugh3b
(Excerpted images 3a & 3b - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh3c McHugh3d
(Excerpted images 3c & 3d - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh3e
(Excerpted image 3e - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh3f
(Excerpted image 3f - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh3g
(Excerpted image 3g - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

TURNING RADII (excerpted from Image 3):

McHugh3h McHugh3i McHugh3j McHugh3k
(Excerpted images 3h, 3i, 3j, & 3k - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh3l McHugh3m McHugh3n McHugh3o
(Excerpted images 3l, 3, 3n, & 3o - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

McHugh3p
(Excerpted image 3p © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

Lastly, J. C. sent me this modern picture of an EMD SW-8{?}, modified for remote control for ArcelorMittal, the world's number one steel company (probably for Chicago-based Mittal Steel USA) and sitting on a McHugh rig:

McHugh
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

McHugh
(Excerpted from above image © McHugh - all rights reserved)

ArcelorMittal locomotive #003 has just been off-loaded from the McHugh heavy haul tractor trailer and is now having the second truck assembly being pulled into place so the unit can be lowered onto both truck assemblies:

McHugh
(Image © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed image for larger, sharper picture.}

Left below - This photo is of J. C., his wife (Ann), and dad (Jimmy):

McHugh0393 McHugh012
(Images 2 & 3 - © McHugh - all rights reserved)
{click on thumbnailed images for larger, sharper pictures.}

Right above - Here the driver is having a few McHugh men check the load height with a measuring pole and a level placed on the roof of the locomotive.



See also the 1950s McHugh Bros. Brochure on McHugh Road Load Continuation Page 1.

See Road Load page 1 for related links and references

Here are some of my own site links (12 May 00):

  My own Road Loads page, et seq.,
  My own Tractors page, and
  My own Big Cranes page, et seq.


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S. Berliner, III

To contact S. Berliner, III, please click here.



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