S. Berliner, III's sbiii.com Schnabel Railroad Car Terminology Page keywords = schnabel schnable rail road freight car terminology geometry CEBX WECX 800 801 Kasgro KRL 3600 3601

Updated:   10 Nov 2019; 23:55  ET
(Created: 09 Nov 2019)

    original AT&T Worldnet Website begun 30 May 1996.]
URL:  http://sbiii.com/rrschtrm.html

S. Berliner, III
Consultant in Ultrasonic Processing
"changing materials with high-intensity sound"

[consultation is on a fee basis]

Technical and Historical Writer, Oral Historian
Popularizer of Science and Technology
Rail, Auto, Air, Ordnance, and Model Enthusiast
Light-weight Linguist, Lay Minister, and Putative Philosopher



note - The vast bulk of my massive Web presence (over 485 pages) had been hosted by AT&T's WorldNet service since 30 May 1996; they dropped WorldNet effective 31 Mar 2010 and I have been scrambling to transfer everything.  Everything's saved but all the links have to be changed, mostly by hand.  See my sbiii.com Transfer Page for any updates on this tedious process.


S. Berliner, III's

sbiii.com

Schnabel Railroad Car
Terminology
and Geometry
Page

RAILROADING



SCHNABEL RAILROAD CARS

(also misspelled "Schnable"* -
by me!)

and other GIANT FREIGHT CARS

(with digressions to highway uses)

[continued]

imgintpg.gif
{and these are mostly only thumbnails, at that!}

[BIG LOADS - BIG PICTURES!]

NOTE:  I regret that some of my internal links refuse to work; if they don't, please click "Back" and scroll.


INDEX

[Index truncated - see the main Schnabel page for a full index.]

On the main Schnabel page:
    Scroll away, plus these specifics -
  Schnabel Diagram.
  Schnabel Car Loading Technique.
  {etc.}

On this Schnabel Railroad Car Terminology and Geometry Page:
  Background on Need for Schnabel Terminology.
  Schnabel Railroad Car Terminology.
  Schnabel Railroad Car Geometry.

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 0:
  72-wheel 880-Ton Schnabel Car.
  More about 72-wheel 880-Ton Schnabel Car.
  {etc.}

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 1:
  Krupp Schnabel Brochure
  Schnabel Linkages
  {etc.}

On the Schnabel Continuation Page 5:
  Schnabel Car Geometry.
  {etc.}

On the Schnabel WECX 801 Page:
  A Second 72-wheel 880-Ton Schnabel Car.

On the Schnabel RR Car WECX 801 Continuation Page 1:
  Further WECX 801 Updates

The Road Loads page:
  Road/Highway Schnabels,
  {etc.}

Something has to lift these giant loads; see Big Cranes.
  {etc.}


Jump to SB,III's RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of RR links

  and to SB,III's MODEL RAILROAD Page for a goodly set of model RR links (yea, verily, forsooth!).


SCHNABEL and other
giant RAILROAD CARS

(and highway variants)

[continued]


If this subject interests you, you must also see Tom Daspit's site!

* - Spelling of the Name:  SCHNABEL vs. SCHNABLE - "Schnabel" is the KORREKT spelling!  It is the German word for "beak", which I originally thought referred to the beak-shaped loading arms, but now know was the name of the German inventor of the design ca. 1930 or so.  I don't know where or when I started using "Schnable", but it was wrong and I don't mind admitting my error.


Background on Need for Schnabel Terminology

Let us start with the basic fact that the two 36-axle Schnabel cars, CEBX 800/WECX 800/KRL 3600 and WECX 801/KRL 3601, are not really individual cars at all unless the half-cars are connected by a drawbar/towbar when running light or by tension beams, skids, and copression members when loaded.  Next, CAD drawings published long ago in (or by} Kalmbach's Model Railroader magazine show an "A End" and a "B End"  That is simply wrong; there's a #1 half-car and a #2 half-car, and an "A" side and a "B" side, as shown my old plan view from the WECX 800) page, documenting the SIDE and END nomenclature:

800tonNomenclature
(10 Nov/14 Jul 2019/19 Aug 2012 image by and © 2019/2012 S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)
Nomenclature

Truck numbering eludes me so far but axle numbering seems to proceed from the coupler end of half-car #2 towards the load end with #1 through #18, as shown below - but whether it then continues onto the other half-car with #19 through #36 or with #18 through #1 again is unclear.

Working up 3D printing models ("models" meaning 3-dimensional drawings) for a Z-scle (1:220) model of BWAX 820, a beefed-up composite version of CEBX 800/WECX 800/KRL 3600 and WECX 801/KRL 3601, I realized that I was missing quite a bit of information, including truck (bogie) ID, numbering, and weight, and asked Kasgro for some help, which, to date,they have studiously ignored.  Guess they have bigger fish to fry.  I also asked ASF-Keystone (Amsted) for the truck ID and weight;one can but try.

Anyway, I have been fairly consistent on these pages with my own terminology where Krupp/Combustion Engineering/TransAlta/Westinghouse/Kasgro data was lacking.  Mea maxima culpa; my worst jumble has been in terming the connection between half-cars when running light as a "towbar" when I think "drawbar" is the more-appropriate term.

Further, because the car is actually two half-cars, it gets terribly confusing as to which end is which.  Krupp made it a wee bit easier with #1 and #2 ends and A and B sides, but still, when considering a half car alone, there has to be a better way.  "Ding!" sez I - regardless of which way one is looking or at which half, I choose to term the coupler/buffer beam/brake-stand end as the "OUTER" end and the load pin/drawbar end as the "INNER" end.  So be it!


From my own Schnabel Continuation Page 5 - Krupp CEBX 800 Schnabel Car Drawings, here is a composite of the clearance diagrams from the original 10 Oct 1980 drawings Krupp made for Combustion Engineering and udated for Trans-Alta and Westinghouse:

cleardiag1
(09 Nov 2019 image by S. Berliner, III, after Krupp/English Westinghouse (by permission)- all rights reserved)

Using that same diagram with color and callouts added, we can see my proposed terminology:

cleardiag2
(09 Nov 2019 image by S. Berliner, III, after Krupp/English Westinghouse (by permission)- all rights reserved)

Page 6 of the Engish Westinghouse drawings is the clearance diagram with the 116' 9"/35.6m long (Co-Op) Husky Bi-Provincial Upgrader, whil(e)(st) page 7 is the clearance diagram of the Trans(-Alta) empty (light) car.

Please note that the Outer Primary Span Bolsters have dropped centers and the outer ends of the Outer Secondary Span Bolsters are lower correspondingly:

OuterPrimarySpanBolster
(cropped from Krupp drawing by S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

This had always puzzled me until I started struggling with 3D printing models ("models" meaning 3-dimensional drawings) when it hit me like a ton of bricks - OF COURSE!  I'll bet that's done so the outermost truck doesn't cant longitudinally upward under draft or buff forces applied above the bolster center pin!

This last is a perfect segué into Schnabel car geometry, which follows.


Schnabel Railroad Car Geometry

From my own Schnabel Continuation Page 5 Schnabel Car Geometry section, the load arms on the more elaborate cars adjust for curving and for shifting.  Here is half a Krupp diagram (from Schnabel Linkages) to indicate that the vertical and horizontal movements occur about separate pivot points; in this way, the functions can be controlled separately.  Hydraulic cylinders move the arms up and down independantly of the lateral angular displacement from curving:

Schnabel Pivots
(24 Apr 2005 drawing by S. Berliner, III - all rights reserved)

Doctoring two different views of the #1 half car, you can see (hopefully) how the articulation of the load arm works:

LoadArmArticulation
(10 Nov 2019 drawing by S. Berliner, III, after Krupp - all rights reserved)

LoadArmArticulation1
(10 Nov 2019 drawing by S. Berliner, III, after Elgin Locomotive Works - all rights reserved)

The arm is lifted by a pair of Primary Lift Cylinders working against a horizontal pivot and kept level by a pair of Secondary Lift Cylinders.  The arm pivots or swivels in the horizontal plane by turning on the vertical Swivel Axis, which runs through the center of the Calotte shell and mating ball.

When running light (no load) and with the two half cars connected by the Drawbar, the possibility of the arm rocking from side to side is controlled (hopefully - see 801 FLIP) by two thin, vertical hydraulic cylinders.  Also when running light, the inner end of the arm is "steered" (guided) by a single, thin, vertical hydraulic cylinder, near the Suspension Lugs-cum-Load Pin Ears, which, when extended, rides on the innermost tip of the Inner Secondary Span Bolster.

Whew!  Get it?  Got it!  Good.

[As noted above, under Terminology, I have to invent my own terminology where necesary; should Kasgro or some other expert resource ever come through with the correct terms, I will attempt to correct and update all these pages (oog!).]

Even more detail on Schnabel car articulation may be found on the Schnabel Continuation Page 5 Schnabel Car Geometry section, as noted above.



I'm NOT depressed, just feeling flat, sort of like I'm in a well,
as if my center had dropped, through, heavy,
split and loaded down - too much on my plate.
I need to shift my load and inch through, if my plate has clearance.
Only joking!


Look also at the main schnabel page, et seq.


You may wish to visit the Railroad Continuation Page, et seq.

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of this series of Railroad pages.


LEGACY

  What happens to all this when I DIE or (heaven forfend!) lose interest?  See LEGACY.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

See Copyright Notice on primary home page.



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